Ducati Scrambler Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I noticed this on a longer ride, but under load and accelerating (80-90MPH and up), I can feel the clutch slip and I can see/feel/hear the RPMs uptick until it catches up. Has anyone looked into an aftermarket clutch, plates, or springs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
I noticed this on a longer ride, but under load and accelerating (80-90MPH and up), I can feel the clutch slip and I can see/feel/hear the RPMs uptick until it catches up. Has anyone looked into an aftermarket clutch, plates, or springs?
I had to address my clutch after raising the performance significantly. The stock clutch simply could not keep up with the added HP.

All that was required for me was to clean and "roughen" the stock plates a bit.

If you have a stock bike, I doubt that you need to do anything other than adjust the cable properly. The adjustment is on the right side, just under the tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Had the same thing.. It even does it in 2nd or 3rd, if you open up the throttle..
Took it to dealer, they said everything is ok, it was adjusted OK..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Mine is slippping too at 80% throttle @6k rpm, dealer confirmed the free play is adjusted correctly and the clutch needs replacing at only 1500 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Have you installed these?
They will be on the bike next week. They shipped last week, I'll report back. I verified with them if they were OE spec or w/ a stiffer spring rate and improved performance. The information I got was that the springs are indeed stiffer and the clutch plates are improved over stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
They will be on the bike next week. They shipped last week, I'll report back. I verified with them if they were OE spec or w/ a stiffer spring rate and improved performance. The information I got was that the springs are indeed stiffer and the clutch plates are improved over stock.

Nice. Look forward to your review.
I'm definitely in the market for a better option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I did both man, the springs provide a much firmer pull that I enjoy far more than stock. ANd you honestly shouldn't waste the labor since there is no clutch cover, you have to take the whole case cover off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
2 years into owning 2016 Urban Enduro

Hey all. High milage scrambler rider here.

I am putting in my 2 cents to clutch fiasco. My 2016 urban enduro had a clutch slippage start at 7500miles in 2016. Dealership made adjustment and solved the problem for a few months but eventually had to be completely replaced. It was nothing short of a customer service nightmare to get situation resolved since dealership didnt want to fix clutch issue under warranty. Came down to meeting Ducati North America's CEO in person to get things moving. Clutch was replaced last June of 2017 @15k miles.

As of September 2018 I am 1k away from my 30k service and the new clutch is slipping preventing bike from really accelerating past 65mph.

This is the first motorcycle I've experienced clutches wearing out rather quickly.

I will be replacing the clutch myself this time around and will give updates as they come.

Anyone else having issues with their clutch replacement? :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Hey Minihuey, I've got just over 12,000 miles on my 2017 Cafe Racer, and I've had clutch slip issues from nearly the beginning of my ownership. You're not alone. They've only worsened over time - as to be expected. The dealer of course checked the cables and lever and said it was in spec. I'm surprised at how inferior the OEM clutch pack is. I've been riding 23 years and only ever replaced one clutch pack on a CBR that I used to use as a stunt bike. I have a GSXR1000 that I've used as a track bike and a tour bike, with 55,000 miles on it and NEVER had to replace the clutch.

Talking with the dealer they've said that the OEM clutch pack is actually the best option for performance, but I am very skeptical. Someone earlier posted a link to Barnett clutches, and I think I'll give them a try. The Barnett products will actually come in about 100$ cheaper than OEM from the dealer. I'll post pics and tips once I complete the swap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
2017 Scrambler Café Racer clutch replacement - plates and springs

I replaced my 2017 Scrambler Cafe Racer OEM wet clutch at 12,500 miles using Barnett clutch plates $239.06 (part number 306-25-20015) and springs $22.96 (part number 501-41-06006). Feel free to ask questions on the thread and I'll do my best to answer. ***** HUGE TIP ***** If you have experienced a slipping clutch on your Scrambler and your mileage is less than 30k I highly recommend you first check the torque of the pusher plate spring bolts and check the thickness of each plate using a micrometer. Reference the service manual for specs. You very likely need to simply tighten the pusher plate spring bolts. Checking these two things may save you the cost of a new clutch pack. Also, don't let your dealer tell you something incredibly useless like, "well, the lever is adjusted just fine." My dealer's mechanic actually rode my bike, experienced the clutch slip and then came back and told me I should lube the cable. I think he might need to go back to mechanic school.

Tools/parts I used (you may be able to use different/fewer tools):
5mm allen wrench (I used a drill to speed up bolt removal)
10mm box wrench (ratcheting is preferred)
11mm box wrench
torque wrench in inch pounds or NM (must be able to toque as little as 5NM)
rubber mallet
Acetone
paint marker
gasket maker
fresh oil /filter
oil pan
funnel
string
clutch plates
clutch springs
brush
magnetic bolt pick-ups
micrometer/calipers

Step 1: remove exhaust pipe sections to expose timing cover and all bolts on the clutch cover. Removal of heat shield is not necessary. Removing the exhaust first allows easier access to remove the oil filter.

Step 2: drain oil by removing oil drain plug (5mm allen wrench); remove oil filter

Step 3: remove right foot peg assembly (10mm wrench) and rear brake switch (11mm wrench). This step is not completely necessary. However, I found removing the peg made accessing the engine much, much easier when cleaning mating surfaces and replacing the cover with gasket maker applied.

Step 4: remove timing belt cover (5mm allen wrench). recommend making a template for the bolts you'll remove from the timing cover and place bolts in a marked pattern.

Step 5: remove clutch cover (5mm allen wrench). recommend making a template for the bolts you'll remove from the clutch cover and place bolts in a marked pattern. You'll need the mallet to unseat the clutch cover from the engine block. Give it some hard raps while simultaneously pulling hard on the tabs. Try to keep the clutch layshaft pointed outward so it does not get caught on the clutch control pin as you pull away the cover.

Step 6: remove clutch hub assembly (5mm allen wrench). remove all 6 pusher plate spring bolts. remove springs. remove pusher plate (clutch control pin included in center). Remove clutch hub. remove all friction plates from clutch housing.
****** You do not need to remove the clutch housing retaining nut if you are simply replacing the friction plates and springs.******
Clean the mating surfaces of the engine and the clutch cover using a brush, or scraper, and wipe residue clean with acetone before applying gasket maker.

Step 7: install new clutch pack. ensure you have the driving and driven plates in the correct order as outlined in the service manual. I found that the easiest way to accomplish this task without removing the clutch housing is to install the plates onto the hub and tie them in place using the core strands of 550 parachute cord. slide the entire pack into the clutch housing being careful to align the fins from the hub with the grooves of the housing.

Step 8: reassembly. install internal springs, pusher plate, pusher plate springs and bolts. torque pusher plate spring bolts to specified torque. apply gasket maker to clutch cover. immediately install clutch cover and tighten bolts in a cross pattern. install foot peg and brake lever if previously removed. install oil filter and drain plug if not already installed. refit timing belt cover. refit all exhaust components. fill engine with appropriate type and quantity of oil.

Step 9: testing. run the engine and check for leaks. double check your clutch lever adjustment as well as the rear brake adjustment. go enjoy your Ducati Scrambler again!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Thanks for that its really useful.
I bought a Barnett set when mine started slipping after a service. By the time the kit got to Spain via the UK from the USA, the clutch was working fine again!
But i´ll need it one day and this will be useful so thanks again for the write up and pics.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top