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Went today and looked at Triumph, Ducati, and Moto Guzzi, and
just feel in love with the Ducati.



Is this too much as a first time owner bike and novice rider?
I feel like it's a great choice, but I"m deferring to the more experienced riders.
 

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hi Zachary Manning

same thing here .... first time owner and novice rider..... but I've been following some sites for customs bikes, scrambler, cafe racer and others... and this ducati got me crazy.... I hope some more experienced riders can give you some more information


BTW I saw the Icon few days ago and made me think I would like the classic better
 

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You can get a lot of training and knowledge by taking a weekend motorcycle safety class. The big advantage with the Scrambler is that it is easy to ride. It is a small bike with a strong, but not crazy engine. I assume that neither of you will try to motocross it. ;)


Get some good protective gear
 

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Karlo/Zach-

I just got the Scrambler Enduro as my 1st bike 2 weeks ago.
Crazily, this was a surprise gift from my wife, and I hadn't even sat on one before seeing this thing in the garage.

My background is minimal riding experience on bikes from 250s to 600s. I had never even straddled a bike this size and with this much power.

From the 1st trip out of the driveway I can confirm that this is an an amazing 1st bike!.
I thought I might be a bit intimidated but The bike gives me a ton of confidence. The bike is light, and nimble for it's size and the available power is just wicked.

The only possible issue, depending on your experience is that out of the factory the full mix is pretty lean and the throttle can feel twitchy. You can read about this all over the various forums. At first the throttle did feel more like an off switch in 1st and 2nd gearing- There is a lot of power there so If you aren't ready it can be surprising. After 150 miles I don't have the problem. I think it is primarily due to simply getting used to it and I'm smoother on the throttle. My dealer owns the classic and he installed the termingoni exhaust which included a Remapped ECU upgrade- he claims it smooths out the low end, this aside from the other benefits. I'll probably be adding that exhaust as my 1st upgrade- The High exhaust pipe that is offered looks pretty bad#ss.

I'm recommending this bike all over the place. If you have any specific questions fire away..
 

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I'm from a different school of thought. As a first street bike, this is a lot of machine and I have witnessed firsthand how much more quickly bad things can happen when new street riders begin on this caliber of machine.

There is no drawback whatsoever to spending your first few thousand miles on a small displacement bike (250-400cc range) or a less powerful, simpler classic standard bike (older Honda, Yamaha of Suzuki from late 70's or 80's are great to learn on).

I have taught many riders and there seems to be a correlation between how quickly and thoroughly people learn and the type of bikes they chose to learn on.

The only thing one does by starting off on a bigger bike is increase their risk. If the Scrambler is the bike you want, work your way up to it and you'll enjoy it that much more when the day comes.
 

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I think it is a good first bike in that you will not out grow it really quickly. This bike will last you for quite a while.

But, it is a little temperamental in the lower gears for a first time rider. It does have a lot of power for its size so you can very easily get into trouble. Of course that same power will get you out of trouble as well.


I would recommend you take a Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider Course on a loaner bike, one that they supply before you buy.
 

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I agree with Motochief and advise you to listen to DJKham. Whatever you decide, invest in good gear and ride your own ride.

Best advice I got. Your first bike should be one that you can ride and is not taking you for a ride. Plus it should not break your heart or your bank account if you drop her.

The scrambler handles well. But with the power, I wouldn't call it a beginner bike. More like a beginner Ducati. You can go from a scooter like ride to >:D real quick.

I coming from the don't do as I did group. ;).

Also, I do highly recommend the MSF course. But, I view it as a safety swim check. Can you swim a full lap, put your head under water, and tread water for 5 minutes. The real learning comes after. Now go jump off the high dive.:D
 

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thanks a lot guys

where I live there is a course that it's about 24 to 32 hours for low CC bikes and 8 or 16 more hours for high CC bikes... it's 100$ per 8 hours.... (I've talked with some people and some say mmmm that's a lot of time I learned in 4 hours how to ride a bike... in fact a coworker says oh men!!! I learned in a monster 700 cc so it will be the same for you)

right now I am running some errands in order to get the permit license and take this course..... they already told me "for the high CC hours you will need to bring your own bike" >:D
 

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I would not recommend the Duc. Scrambler as a first bike. Many countries apart from the USA imposed tight limits on HP and CC for first time riders in the 70's - (in my case it was a 250CC limit for the first year, now there is a HP and HP per weight limit) - these limits could be seen as a function of the 'nanny state' but were established (at least in Australia where I come from) as a reaction to the overwhelmingly high statistics of inexperienced riders and accidents correlated to motorcycle HP.

I've ridden for almost 40 years. Every day on the streets here in Singapore I use reflexes and skills I developed in motocross racing and trail riding in my first few years of riding - I've jumped curbs, controlled skids, power slid around trouble, emergency braked and almost always as a reaction to other idiots - not because of my mistake. A lot of my relatives (spouse and son) want to ride as well but I am insistent they spend time 'falling off' off road first. With a bike you rarely get a second chance... and having a snatchy throttle and 200kph capacity is just asking for trouble.

I'd recommend a TW200 or a KTM Duke 390 with ABS (not sure they are on sale yet in the USA) as great, great starter bikes that retain good value. There are of course hundreds of other second models out there but I'm not a fan of older run down bikes in inexperienced hands as it just adds another risk factor.

As an Australian politican remaked a decade or so ago... "If motorbikes were invented today they'd be banned from the road instantly". While he's a drongo (idiot) his point is valid - you are taking onto the public road a vehicle that is not optimized for the modern highway but came from the era of horse and buggy with almost no changes.

"This is a duty of care statement but not legal advice".
 

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Definitely not a good bike for a novice.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Whatever bike you get. Enjoy!

But remember.

Approach your riding in this way.

Assume no one has seen you and all other vehicles are out to kill you. Always leave yourself a way out.

:)
 

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I got a Scrambler FT for my first bike after years of riding scooters on and off on vacations. My mileage on scooters can't be more then 500 miles.

So basically Scrambler is my fist bike. Let me list what I did to get ready. Hopefully it might help you.

1. I got good gear, full face helmet, shoes, jacket and riding jeans (although I know they are not the most protective pants)
2. I went to 2 day safety and motorcycle control class.
3. After I got the bike I really took it slow for around 100 miles without going much over 4000 rpm
4. I used the throttle very very carefully to the extent that my hands would hurt after 30 min ride because I was tring too hard not to give it too much throttle (Scrambler has a very twitchy throttle until you get used to it).
5. I got a motorcycle control class with my bike after 250 miles.
6. I always try to respect the bike as it demands it full time.

And one more thing, I rode one of my friends Honda enduro 250cc and it felt like a bicycle after the scrambler. So I feel like it is definitely better to get a smaller cc bike, but if you respect the bike and know your limits Scrambler can be a good beginner bike that you will not grow out of after 2-3 thousand miles. I got it because it looked so **** cool!!!

Thats my 2 cents, hope it helps!
 

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I'm from a different school of thought. As a first street bike, this is a lot of machine and I have witnessed firsthand how much more quickly bad things can happen when new street riders begin on this caliber of machine.

There is no drawback whatsoever to spending your first few thousand miles on a small displacement bike (250-400cc range) or a less powerful, simpler classic standard bike (older Honda, Yamaha of Suzuki from late 70's or 80's are great to learn on).

I have taught many riders and there seems to be a correlation between how quickly and thoroughly people learn and the type of bikes they chose to learn on.

The only thing one does by starting off on a bigger bike is increase their risk. If the Scrambler is the bike you want, work your way up to it and you'll enjoy it that much more when the day comes.
So I'm in the same camp as the OP and second response in this thread--just finished my Safety Course successfully (did a lot better than I thought I would actually), and am just waiting on forms for my licensing process. I'm a 29-year-old guy who grew up driving manual cars with touchy clutches and way-too-wide gears at the bottom end, but I fully recognize that's likely an apples to oranges comparison with motorcycle transmissions, especially given utterly incomparable power/weight ratio difference.

However, after the safety course, one thing I came away with from talking with the instructors and more experienced riders participating was that, for me, lack of ABS is much more of a deal-breaker for me than it was before. The other bikes in my set of options, the Triumph Bonneville or Scrambler and Moto Guzzi V7 Stone appear to lack this feature. Granted, the new V7 Stone II ABS will have it, as the name implies, but that's a few months away, apparently, and doesn't seem to receive the same level of approval for a first bike as either of the Triumphs do. Also, price wise, the Ducati wins as well.

So, where does that leave me? Is this thing so powerful that I could just never put it in first and just start off the line in second every time? Is there any level of adjustability or configuration that can add some tempering to the unbridled torque in lower gears? Am I guaranteed to massacre myself on this by accidentally gripping too high on the throttle?
 

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I've been riding for decades, and I've owned over 30 bikes. If I were learning to ride today, I'd follow the advice of Asiaoildude above here somewhere, and buy a KTM 390 Duke; it is available in the US now, and I don't believe you'll get tired of it quickly. (And if you do, somebody will be happy to buy it from you, maybe even me.) I do think it's important to buy something very light and user friendly, as both attributes are directly proportional to building confidence and skill. It will still take you over 100 mph, power delivery is predictable and smooth, and handling is effortless. The KTM weighs >20% less than the Scrambler.


As several people mentioned, the twitchy throttle characteristics of the Scrambler, especially at low rpm, is not at all user friendly. Couple that with the harsh stock suspension, and you're likely to find yourself unexpectedly lunging forward after hitting a small road irregularity. Not confidence inspiring, and possibly painful.


On the other hand, if you are inspired and even obsessed by the Scrambler and must have it -- you should follow your passion. There are worse choices for a first bike. You might consider getting a Termi slip-on installed before taking delivery, it will help a little with the throttle. Maybe an aftermarket shock absorber too.
 

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I've been riding for decades, and I've owned over 30 bikes. If I were learning to ride today, I'd follow the advice of Asiaoildude above here somewhere, and buy a KTM 390 Duke; it is available in the US now, and I don't believe you'll get tired of it quickly. (And if you do, somebody will be happy to buy it from you, maybe even me.) I do think it's important to buy something very light and user friendly, as both attributes are directly proportional to building confidence and skill. It will still take you over 100 mph, power delivery is predictable and smooth, and handling is effortless. The KTM weighs >20% less than the Scrambler.


As several people mentioned, the twitchy throttle characteristics of the Scrambler, especially at low rpm, is not at all user friendly. Couple that with the harsh stock suspension, and you're likely to find yourself unexpectedly lunging forward after hitting a small road irregularity. Not confidence inspiring, and possibly painful.


On the other hand, if you are inspired and even obsessed by the Scrambler and must have it -- you should follow your passion. There are worse choices for a first bike. You might consider getting a Termi slip-on installed before taking delivery, it will help a little with the throttle. Maybe an aftermarket shock absorber too.
EDIT: Was able to look it up just now, has ABS! Hmmm, this is actually something of a serious contender now, the only drawback being what looks like ergonomics, no cargo capacity (somewhat the same as the Scrambler here), and it's hideous.

ABS? Sorry, I should have emphasized that more--I'm really hinging on that point currently, unlikely to be dissuaded away from it.
 

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So, where does that leave me? Is this thing so powerful that I could just never put it in first and just start off the line in second every time? Is there any level of adjustability or configuration that can add some tempering to the unbridled torque in lower gears? Am I guaranteed to massacre myself on this by accidentally gripping too high on the throttle?
Okay, I might get I trouble here. So first I will be a bit responsible. I'm going to pretend your my younger kid brother though and shoot straight also. Your question deserves a pontification :nerd:. My brother would know to run now. He knows I'm the one without any common sense.

I wouldn't recommend your first purchase to be based on a style or image. I wouldn't even recommend the Triumph or the Moto Guzzi, and I like both. I would point someone to a Honda/Yamaha/Ninja 300. If they just had to have more power due to physical size or highway riding, I would suggest the new Honda 500x. All have ABS options.

The KTM duke mentioned before: :cool: cool. I don't know anything about their maintenance (or ABS), but you are looking at a Ducati :D.

When I hear the question: Is this a suitable bike? The person asking the question (and on the internet) has really already made up his mind. They are typically just wanting an Okay. I can really only say: Be smart, Be careful.

It's your decision, your responsibility.

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Now that being said, I do wish I had started with this bike. As I said before though, I come from the Don't do as I did crowd.

But yes, you can start with this bike. Some whom I know personally, I would tell yes - others no. Some I would suggest start with a bicycle. I can't judge your riding or capability through the web. You really don't know mine.

Of the three bikes you mentioned which would have been my initial list: the Scrambler.

During my first purchase, I went out to look at mopeds. ;) When the salesman saw me making love to the Monster on the floor :x , it was over. If it was me all over again, the Scrambler. But would you really follow me or anyone else here into a dark back room >:D.

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So back to the power issue. It's not all that unbridled.0:)

The snatchy throttle will most likely be sorted with an ECU mapping in the future, but the power will still be immediate - but smoother.

It is a little snatchy, but it's not that snatchy. At the same time, I picturing that front tire lifting as someone gooses it the first time.

The bike handles so well, I feel like a kid with a scooter in the parking lot. This is the feeling everyone wants you to have with a new bike. This is one reason why the lower power is recommended.

[Writer deleted flaming remarks about skill level and riders complaints about slow maneuvering problems, not handling well in traffic due to the snatchy throttle, throttle guards. Really, it just isn't productive :D]

My hang up is that the bike handles so well, you forget the power. Which can get you into trouble. The bike is deceptively cute. Many times I have looked down at the speedo and well >:D.

I mentioned before it is easy to go from 0:) to >:D with this bike. Part of the fun. But it is just as easy to go from 0:) to >:D to :eek: to :crying:. But no, you are not guaranteed to massacre yourself due the throttle. (You usually made the mistake long before then)

I am assuming when you said auto clutch experience that meant no auto traction assist. Would even be better if you had no ABS.

Why? It meant you gained the the subtle skills of correcting your car and not depending on the electronics.

Think back to when you started. All those skills you had to learn over the years: how to correct a skid. When to break, How much to break, or Even not to break and just steer. The first time you hydroplaned towards a wall. Not to stop on a snow covered hill. Learned four wheel drive is not going to stop you on ice. Etc.

Well, as a beginner motorcyclist, you are that kid again. Even if you are starting at 50. More so, because you have preconceived notions. It's going to take time in the saddle. Different motor skills. Target fixation anyone?

Experience should be measured in terms of miles riding in an environment (100,000 plus to be mature). City riding is different than canyon which is different than interstate touring, etc. Which still makes me a still a young rider.

When your riding a motorcycle, there is so much happening in the environment that controlling your throttle should be not be taking too much of your attention. You only have so much. When things go wrong. You won't have any.

What starting with a lower power bike gains you is a margin of safety/error. Think of someone learning to handle ice starting with a clutch rear wheel pony car vs a front wheel drive base fiat. Which car would you recommend your kid start with?

Remember, it's all about risk reduction. The initial decision is not sane: you are a bag of jelly on a hunk of metal going ## mph down the tarmac :D.
 

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I will attempt to illustrate my earlier point home with a quick example that is relevant here: a good friend of mine who is in his mid-30s and very mature/responsible got into motorcycling this spring. For his first bike, he desperately wanted a Ducati. Try as I might, it was impossible to talk him out of it. So, I did what any good friend would do and taught him as best as I could. Started him on one of my smaller vintage bikes, literally pushing him around a parking lot with the bike in neutral, not even running and gradually worked him up from there. He took the rider training course from a local riding school. For his first bike, he ended up getting his dream machine and bought a Monster 796 (similar in many ways to the Scrambler).

Four weeks into ownership, he target fixated in a corner, going only a little bit faster than the speed limit and the bike was written off. Thank God he was not injured. He was wearing full protective gear but ended up 30 feet from the bike on his back, in a ditch after hitting a guard rail. It was a beautiful sunny day. No other vehicles around.

The point of my story is not to say that everyone who buys this type of machine will get into an accident. The challenge with getting into this much machine out of the gate is that it is designed to inspire a lot more confidence than your abilities will allow for at the start of your riding career.

As a new rider, it's actually better to be on a bike that is not very capable because the limited confidence it provides (for example, how nervous a bike feels at a given speed or through a corner) creates a sense of danger that will keep you from over-stepping your limits (which, by the way, are and will remain completely unknown to you when you start riding, no matter how good of a rider you think you might be in your first year).

So the message here is not that it cannot be done (get a Scrambler as your first bike and not crash), but that by doing so, you are needlessly increasing your risk and endangering yourself in an inherently dangerous sport. I hate seeing good people have bad experiences with this incredible passion of ours which is why I'm writing this.
 

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I agree with most of what was written above, but think it can be done. A lot of people buy Suzuki SV650 bikes as their first and I think the Scrambler is a similar experience if not safer. I'm at the point now where I wish the Scrambler was more powerful and I'm able to really rip around town on it. Going back to my vintage bikes is painful because they feel SO SLOW now. However, before I had the scrambler they didn't feel slow and they are in reality, plenty fast.

On a vintage or weak bike the throttle comes on slow and you also have maybe a bit more time to decide what to do when that guard rail is coming up quickly in a turn. However, the Ducati can be thought of as safer than a lot of slower bikes because it also brakes better, has wider tires, has ABS, etc... You can get yourself out of trouble on the Ducati at X speed better than a lot of slow, old, vintage bikes. Say you're going 35mph and need to swerve, the Ducati is a great bike to do it on.

But if you're having to think about everything you're doing and riding isn't just coming to you naturally yet, it's probably best to stay on something less quick. But the bike is not scary at all. I've had a lot of bikes and have been riding now for 25 years, but nothing on the Scrambler scares me like say, a Suzuki GSXR 1000 where you can actually use the throttle to throw yourself off of the bike. The Scrambler is pretty docile compared to a lot of other bikes that I see new riders on.
 
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