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I just ride as if any other road user may not have seen me - and am particularly careful passing side roads, junctions etc. I am not a reckless rider and don't filter unless it's as safe as it can possibly to do so - I have seen some riders taking unbelievable risks filtering fast through narrow gaps - I would rather arrive later but alive!

I also leave a decent gap between myself and the vehicle in front unless I am just about to overtake.

Some car drivers take huge exception to riders passing them in queues and I know people who have had car doors deliberately open on them; another friend had a car driver open the window and spray her with water as she overtook!!

Knowing how stupid some drivers are (and also riders) I am doubly careful on two wheels. I always wear safety gear as I have come off and had my leg broken - so hate to think how bad the damage might have been had I just had jeans and trainers :eek:. As for hi-viz clothing - I am not sure whether this actually makes drivers see you more but it certainly can't hurt to wear it.

Eye contact - you have to be pretty close to look them in the eye! I make sure I have room to brake if a car appears at a side road - although of course you can't cover every situation.

But I don't let horror stories or vids worry me either ;)
 

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I've ridden/driven in quite a few countries and think Australian drivers are some of the worse in the world. Pretty much agree with what littleowl say's but basically treat it as if every other person on the road doesn't care.If you're on a bike, don't get into a road rage situation, a car is a lot bigger than you.
 

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Always ride proactively, don't let things just happen. There are very few accidents that can't be avoided although sometimes **** happens.

Safe riding is a matter of planning and using your forward vision. Look as far ahead as possible, not just at the road you can see. If you're riding through countryside and you see a farm atop the next hill, think about what that might mean, mud on the road, farm vehicle emerging etc and plan accordingly.

Don't ride the racing line, ride the vision line. What that means is ride the line that gives you the best visibility ahead and any other traffi the earliest opportunity to see you.

Make yourself visible. Move about, moving objects are caught in the peripheral vision even if the other road user isn't looking directly at you.

Always ensure that you are able to stop in the space you can see to be clear on your side of the road. Pretty obvious but you'd be amazed how many people don't.

Always ride your own ride. Don't get sucked into riding faster than your ability allows. And don't get sucked into an overtake by a rider in front of you. Plan your own overtakes.

Get some advanced training. It'll make you faster and safer, you get more enjoyment out of your bike and you'll meet a lot of new like minded people. Read the police riders handbook, "Roadcraft", its available on Amazon, and practice what it tells you. Ride to "The System", (Information, Position, Speed, Gear, Action). It applies to EVERY situation and could save your life.

The best change you can make to any bike is the rider.

Jerry
 

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very touching video. thanks for sharing. my top safety tips for riding are:

1. ATGATT - (wear) All The Gear, All The Time.

2. Ride only 'as fast as your eyes can see' (it varies). - from my riding instructor.

3. Always ride inside the 'bubble gum' - this is for urban riding and also comes from my instructor - when one starts rolling the bike, imagine you are riding inside a bubble gum of 1m radius, as you pick up speed, the size of this bubble gum increases and goes up to 3m radius at higher speeds. you can go faster but remember that the bubble 'self-distructs' beyond sane speeds. don't let anyone burst your 'bubble gum', slow down and let others pass if they insist on bursting it or come too close!

4. Learn to stop before you learn to speed. - also from my instructor.
:)
 

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I can avoid a lot of what's in front of me. I can't avoid what's behind me a lot of times. Keep an eye on your 6:00 always. Good mirrors have saved my life when I was about to be run over. People in cars not paying attention to my slowing and turn signals. I had to get on the shoulder of the road or hug the middle of the road because the person behind me would have hit (and probably killed) me.

This has happened to me at least 5 times since I've been riding. The people who turn left in front of me, merge into me, deer.... They're easier to avoid than people who are going to run you over at a stop light or when you're trying to turn into your driveway off of a highway.

I've been buying better gear. I just bought Dainese City Guard summer body armor. And I bought a new Dainese leather jacket. I'm going to force myself to wear my good helmets (I have two Arai helmets now) because I was in the habit of wearing my functionless Davida. I have a baby now, so I feel more inclined to stay alive than I did in the past.

I've had people blow past me at a full 55mph when I was slowing to turn. They were not paying any attention even though I brake and use the signal for a long distance (I live on a highway.) I just watch my mirrors religiously because people already have their minds set on being out of town. This happens at least once a week where someone sees me too late.

But we still have to be honest with ourselves that riding comes at a high risk of injury and death. It's the trade-off for the joy. Is it worth it? I just make calculated risks. I won't enter myself into the Isle of Man TT because I know I'm not that good of a rider. But I will still mix it up with strangers piloting two ton killing boxes on wheels. Mostly because I find them somewhat easy to avoid.

I own vintage Vespa scooters which are much more dangerous to ride in traffic than motorcycles are. I cut my teeth on scooters before having fast bikes, so I'm just used to everyone trying to kill me. It's like a game of chess. You play three moves ahead in your mind so that you're ready for it when it happens.

And I can say all of this and still be killed this afternoon. Nothing is guaranteed. You just do whatever increases your odds of survival.
 

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But we still have to be honest with ourselves that riding comes at a high risk of injury and death. It's the trade-off for the joy. Is it worth it? I just make calculated risks. I won't enter myself into the Isle of Man TT because I know I'm not that good of a rider. But I will still mix it up with strangers piloting two ton killing boxes on wheels. Mostly because I find them somewhat easy to avoid.
The irony being that you'd probably be safer riding the TT. Everyone's going in the same direction and everyone knows what they're doing.

Jerry
 

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Always wear a full armour. Even for jumping to near store for coke. My friend last year did a slide on wet in normal jeans without protection. It was with maybe 40 km/h and you do not want have legs like he had.
 

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Always wear a full armour. Even for jumping to near store for coke. My friend last year did a slide on wet in normal jeans without protection. It was with maybe 40 km/h and you do not want have legs like he had.
Been shopping around for some kevlar pants, well worth the investment, normal jeans just make you way too vulnerable
hopefully no one here has to learn the hard way.
 

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Very true.. I just know my own level of skill and try to ride accordingly. I see a LOT of riders in this area who have no business being on a bike. And most of the ones that do die are not wearing helmets. There's some unspoken rule about not owning a helmet if you have a Harley around here.

I've witnessed a lot more bike accidents that were the rider's fault than the person or object they came into contact with. I'm just a technical type of person so I'm always analyzing and thinking about what could happen. I see so many people happy with the probability of nothing ever going wrong that they get really complacent when riding. They may not ride aggressively or dangerously, but just not aware enough for my comfort. My friends that bum around town on their bikes in sweatshirts and sandals wearing ear buds just make me really uncomfortable.

But I try to be honest with myself, knowing that nothing is guaranteed to keep us alive. And we probably all know someone that survived a 100mph spill while wearing shorts and someone else that died in full gear at low speed. It's pretty random.

This photo from my city is from a few years ago. The guy on the yellow bike died. He was wearing full race leathers and a matching helmet. The woman in the Kia pulled out in front of him and he t-boned her door. She walked away with the simple excuse that she was texting her friend. He was only going 25mph at the time of impact. I rode by the police impound lot to take this photo as a reminder to myself that there's nothing written in stone as to how the outcome of a get-off will pan out. This was a guy on a yellow bike wearing yellow gear. Just to try to stay alert and know your own limitations.

 

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She walked away with the simple excuse that she was texting her friend. He was only going 25mph at the time of impact. I rode by the police impound lot to take this photo as a reminder to myself that there's nothing written in stone as to how the outcome of a get-off will pan out. This was a guy on a yellow bike wearing yellow gear. Just to try to stay alert and know your own limitations.

She walked away admitting she was texting while driving :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek: you do that here these days and kill someone you're going to be doing a bit of time at Her Majestys Pleasure. Unbelievable.

Jerry
 

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1) Ride as if absolutely no other vehicles can see you.
2) Assume if they can see you, they're trying to kill you.
3) Wear all the protective gear, all the time - no excuses.
4) Realize that no matter what you do, how proactive you are, how good of a rider you are, you're doing something inherently dangerous and every ride you take could be your last. Make sure you not only appreciate that sentiment, but you do all you can to protect those who love you if the worst does occur - life insurance, financial planning, etc. and tell them you love them every chance you get.
5) Oh ya..ride smart and ENJOY!

:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
1) Ride as if absolutely no other vehicles can see you.
...ride smart and ENJOY!

:D
Wow, this thread has become an impressive list of good advice! Thank you all.
Almost all my thoughts have been said already, except: Since I jumped once over and above a car door (hit at 60 km/h, jump saved my life, bike looked like hit by an axe, door was gone) I am passing all parking and standing cars with a side distance of a car width. Especially when parked perpendicular. Traffic jam lane splitting I go extremely slow. Still scared about this after 25 y. And I bought an airbag vest together with the icon. It´s light, simple, and may help a little one day. If interested google Helite turtle.

0:) Safe scrambling!
 

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Make your pipe louder. Being spoted by car driver is worth more than a ticket;)

Since I've been overridden by young guys in very old BMW I always try to have louder pipe than their music was.

I hope FT termi pipe will be enough;)
 

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Body armor all the time, every time.. treat ever driver as an idiot.. better still as a texting teenager... assume drivers have not seen you... keep aware at all times... I commute every day and see many many car drivers with their faces buried in their cell phone screens.. old and young alike... something has to be done about that..
 

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1) Ride as if absolutely no other vehicles can see you.
2) Assume if they can see you, they're trying to kill you.
^This. Also, if safety is not your #1 priority, you should probably pick a different hobby.

As far as the video--don't let horror stories scare you off the bike, let them convince you to do things like take that refresher motorcycle safety course you've been putting off.
 

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It's true that mobile phones are responsible for some unbelievable driving reactions from car drivers and I think will continue to be as many people seem unable to ignore a text or phone call. I've seen cars swerve suddenly to a stop at the most dangerous of locations (junctions, blind bends) to take a call - and the car on a motorway that suddenly slows down and starts weaving is more than likely using a phone. So another ever present risk for a motorcyclist to watch out for!

But despite all the hazards we have to encounter the pleasures of biking outweigh the risks - we'd all give up otherwise - lets all enjoy our Scramblers, life's too short to worry about the what ifs :)
 

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It's true that mobile phones are responsible for some unbelievable driving reactions from car drivers and I think will continue to be as many people seem unable to ignore a text or phone call. I've seen cars swerve suddenly to a stop at the most dangerous of locations (junctions, blind bends) to take a call - and the car on a motorway that suddenly slows down and starts weaving is more than likely using a phone. So another ever present risk for a motorcyclist to watch out for!

But despite all the hazards we have to encounter the pleasures of biking outweigh the risks - we'd all give up otherwise - lets all enjoy our Scramblers, life's too short to worry about the what ifs :)
We share the sam "attitude" ;)
 
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