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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi guys

I'm 33 yo...I don't own a car but I really want a bike...
some people tell me hey great idea get a small bike something like 200cc to learn and after that get something bigger 700 or 800.

some data:
height: 177 cm
weight: 70 kg

should I buy a 200 cc and learn and some time later get this Scrambler Icon? :D

second question
someone told me this bike (scramble icon)would be kinda heavy for you.... that's why I added my weight above? what do you think?

thanks guys
 

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Hi Karlo!
I´m thinking a 250cc would be great to start. But if you really like the bike then I suggest you go for it.
If you are not in love with it, I would think about spending this amount of money on a first bike; unless I really know it´s what I have been waiting for.
I don't think the weight will be an issue, it is not a heavy bike at all for it´s category.
either way if you take it slow and having respect for what you are on, you should have no problems at all.
What you should probably do any how is buy a Bike, no matter the cc!! :)
At least thats my thought! hope It helps!
Cheers!
 

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hi guys

I'm 33 yo...I don't own a car but I really want a bike...
some people tell me hey great idea get a small bike something like 200cc to learn and after that get something bigger 700 or 800.

some data:
height: 177 cm
weight: 70 kg

should I buy a 200 cc and learn and some time later get this Scrambler Icon? :D

second question
someone told me this bike (scramble icon)would be kinda heavy for you.... that's why I added my weight above? what do you think?

thanks guys
I am almost identical to you in size but much older...

The bike is neither too heavy nor too powerful, you should be fine.
As you may have read the Scrambler is very capable of surprising you by pulling a wheelie if you open her up, but that can happen to you on a 80 cc dirtbike as well.
 

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hi guys

I'm 33 yo...I don't own a car but I really want a bike...
some people tell me hey great idea get a small bike something like 200cc to learn and after that get something bigger 700 or 800.

some data:
height: 177 cm
weight: 70 kg

should I buy a 200 cc and learn and some time later get this Scrambler Icon? :D

second question
someone told me this bike (scramble icon)would be kinda heavy for you.... that's why I added my weight above? what do you think?

thanks guys
It's considered much safer and cheaper to learn on a bike with lower power and weight. As a new rider, you will probably drop / damage the bike you are learning on. It's easier to control a small bike. Having said that, I did not follow that advice when I learned to ride many years ago and I never had a problem. If you can afford the Scrambler and can afford to fix it a time or two, then by all means get the Scrambler. It has all the attributes of a reasonably good learner bike, albeit expensive for that role. Your height and weight are just fine for this bike.
 

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hi guys



should I buy a 200 cc and learn and some time later get this Scrambler Icon? :D
Yes, that would be a good start. Here are two things to consider. Anything under 500cc is really going to be working at highway speeds. 200-250cc would be fine as a city hopper with occasional highway speeds for short distances. The size of the engine factors into the kind of riding you'll be doing and how hard it will need to work. Generally smaller cc'ed engines are lighter bikes, but are also more subjected to natures elements. A lighter bike will be pushed around more in heavy winds than something heavier.

second question
someone told me this bike (scramble icon)would be kinda heavy for you.... that's why I added my weight above? what do you think?

thanks guys
The Scrambler really is a pretty light bike for the size engine it has, they don't get much lighter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Karlo!
I´m thinking a 250cc would be great to start. But if you really like the bike then I suggest you go for it.
If you are not in love with it, I would think about spending this amount of money on a first bike; unless I really know it´s what I have been waiting for.
I don't think the weight will be an issue, it is not a heavy bike at all for it´s category.
either way if you take it slow and having respect for what you are on, you should have no problems at all.
What you should probably do any how is buy a Bike, no matter the cc!! :)
At least thats my thought! hope It helps!
Cheers!
thanks kirkgarcia, I've been following this model of bike fro quite some time now... I wanted a Triumph like a year ago but they have something I don't like some days ago I saw this one and I fell in love
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's considered much safer and cheaper to learn on a bike with lower power and weight. As a new rider, you will probably drop / damage the bike you are learning on. It's easier to control a small bike. Having said that, I did not follow that advice when I learned to ride many years ago and I never had a problem. If you can afford the Scrambler and can afford to fix it a time or two, then by all means get the Scrambler. It has all the attributes of a reasonably good learner bike, albeit expensive for that role. Your height and weight are just fine for this bike.
yeah that's my concern learning and drop it :eek:
 

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You're the same size as me and I consider the Scrambler to be a physically small bike with a fairly powerful engine.

You SHOULD be just fine with one. It depends on what your situation is financially, space-wise, and location as to what you want to do about learning to ride confidently.

Here in the middle of the USA you can buy a crappy Buell Blast or Suzuki Savage for 1500 dollars any day of the week, ride it a year, and sell it for 1500 dollars when you're done.

But some people don't like buying and selling or having to deal with registration and insurance costs of a bunch of bikes.

But if you have over a 28" inseam for your pants, you should be able to easily handle this bike and its weight.

Where I live it's spread out so accidents and crashes are fairly rare, but in a busy urban environment as a newcomer to riding, I'd think a lot more about my own safety and probably own a different first bike.
 

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karlo, perhaps a triumph bonneville, although heavier, may be better. my wife learned on one and now she can ride anything! used they should be kinda inexpensive. here in the USA they are 3 and 4 thousand for one that is 4 or 5 years old.
 

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Id recommend going straight for the scrambler. I'm 168 cm and 70 kg and I ride a Suzuki sv650s at the moment which is both heavier and taller than the scrambler. It's also quoted less power than the ducati as well. I passed my test a year ago and went straight for the SV and don't regret it at all. If anything, Im yearning for more power! The only thing that put me off buying new is the threat of dropping it. My sv cost me £1800 and I've dropped it once in the year I've had it. The crash bobbins completely saved it and there was not even a scuff to the bike. The scrambler is supposed to be a rugged bike so fit some crash bungs and you won't look back, trust me.
 

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your welcome carlo. my friend, a;fredo, never once owned a bike and then bought an R1 and dropped it the second day. cost $400 to fix litle things that broke. Now he has the guzzi cafe and is way more confident. He went "backwards" but everything smooths out in the end. If you don't mind me saying....
 

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your welcome carlo. my friend, a;fredo, never once owned a bike and then bought an R1 and dropped it the second day. cost $400 to fix litle things that broke. Now he has the guzzi cafe and is way more confident. He went "backwards" but everything smooths out in the end. If you don't mind me saying....


$400? He was probably lucky, an R1 as your first bike is only ever going to end badly, the only question is how badly!


Speaking as an advanced riding instructor I'd suggest learning on something small to gain road sense, confidence and bike knowledge before stepping up.


While the throttle goes both ways I've seen too many people who appear determined to become a statistic to think that the sort of power experience that you can only get from driving a supercar should be put into the hands of a rider with no experience.


As many people have suggested, anything up to a 250 would be good place to start and be prepared to pay for some damage because there will almost certainly be some in that first year of riding, even if it's only from dropping it.


Get some proper training, the best improvement you can make to any bike is the rider. You'll be safer, faster and you'll enjoy your bike more.


Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
thanks a lot guys

well I live in Costa Rica and in fact my option to go small was the Bajaj/Pulsar 200NS, an old one 2014 the yellow one.... yeah I'm love with yellow so I will be riding this one for a while some time later go with the Scrambler Icon Yellow one of course :)

I going to see if there's anything 250cc in Costa Rica that might be good to start as well
I really don't want to pay much some times is difficult to sell in Costa Rica and I don't want to spend lot of money, here a Scrambler Icon is 14K $$$ the basic model a the pulsar 2014 is about 3300$.

thanks a lot
 
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