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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most roads around where I live are poorly surfaced and bumpy and after a week riding around I conclude that the Scramblers suspension is not good! It feels harsh at both ends (wherever the preload is on the rear) probably down to damping. hit a bump and it goes right through you, hit a series of bumps or even ripples and you have to hang on tight.
I did notice this on my test ride of around 40 miles but at the time I was more concerned with the initial dive at the front end that made it feel a little unstable when pitching into a turn. My dealer allowed me to try a heavier (15weight) oil to stiffen it up a bit but I have since been shown the error of my ways by SBKen of SB suspension US.
The bike is now stable pitching into turns but the damping issue is even worse so I am thinking of returning to the original 7.5weight oil but that would leave me back to square one.
For me, a slightly stiffer spring (even initially on progressive wound) with less damping could hopefully give more comfort over bad roads.
Unfortunately, no one sells anything like this yet front or rear in the UK.
Unless of course, any of our forum members know different?
 

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having only the preload to set, if the rear mono it looks "hard"... the only thing you can do, is reduce the preload, you will have more excursion. however the preload shoud be adjusted according to the weight the bike will carry and not only to "soft" the sunspensio
 

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The bike is great except for the suspension. We still haven't received any "for sale" bikes in the US. At one of the Scrambler events in the states. I watched as everyone tried the bike on. The spring in the rear works for no one! Even if the front is working half way decent, the bike is sagging so bad in the rear that the front can't turn properly or dampen. I will have a shock for sale in about 30 days. A front upgrade is soon to follow. Unfortunately, the states are waiting on a very slow boat!
 

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On the rear, it is easy to find a extra inch with a aftermarket shock. The question is do you want it in length or in travel(stroke)? The front is limited by the bushing placement for increasing length. To find more length a aftermarket fork cap would be needed. Usually available for aftermarket cartridge kits. The front forks already has a longer stroke than a average sport bike.
 

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So, I would be interested in additional suspension travel - ride height increase would be a by-product of the increase.


Logic is if the shock is replaced, someone like me would find one with additional stroke to equate to roughly an inch of travel increase.


I've been searching the net for 41mm inverted forks that would fit the clamps and support the radial mount brake caliper. Nothing is leaping to the top.


Don't know.
Maybe a properly tuned six inch suspension travel could work.


My suspension tune would favor gravel roads with potholes and two-track Jeep trails. Street personality would then be what it is.


This is how I would want my Scrambler set up. Certainly, will watch the aftermarket to see what becomes available.


It's part of the lure of the Scrambler! ;)
 

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I think this is weird. I've got no problem with the back end but the front end on mine is wayyyyy too harsh. I weigh 180 pounds and I don't hang about but it seems to me that people are experiencing different problems with different bikes. I know that a lot of this can be down to different weights, riding styles etc.


My dealer has a WSB team and as such have a suspension specialist on the staff and they're looking into what can be done for me. I'll let you all know what they come up with.


Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm with you Jerry, the front is the main culprit being far too harsh. I suffered tennis elbow a couple of years ago and 260miles on my scrambler has set it off again.
I like to crack on a bit in the bends and the bike does handle well, it is dead flickable and the tyres are a lot more sure footed than they look. Again though, the damping both ends needs work (front 1st) just to cope with a series of bumps.
I weigh around 165lb btw

Be sure to let us know all the details/results when Moto Rapido sorts something out for you.

All the suspension woes won't put me off the Scrambler 'It's too beautiful'
 

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I gave the bike a good varied ride on last weeks test ride and thought the rear was fine and as Jerry said the front needs work as I am also watching what Jerry's dealer might suggest trying with interest
 

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JerryS,

I think you're onto something here,

"I think this is weird. I've got no problem with the back end but the front end on mine is wayyyyy too harsh. I weigh 180 pounds and I don't hang about but it seems to me that people are experiencing different problems with different bikes. I know that a lot of this can be down to different weights, riding styles etc."

I'm 100 kg's (220 lbs) I can almost bottom the front under brakes and the bike is pretty much nose down all the time, the rear is so hard I need a kidney belt, The front seems well damped just too soft a spring, the rear is simply too hard, two up on the lowest preload seems ok early in the stroke but firms up too much further down, jarring even two up.

I read Doc59 at 75 kg's finds the rear on his ok, it appears different bikes are behaving differently.
 

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With my bike I found the front to be fine and the rear rather harsh! But have only been out once - however I did experience all kinds of roads. I have the preload set to its softest and I am 130lbs. I just raise myself up a little when the going gets rough and don't feel a thing ...
 

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It's interesting how different people are interpreting whether the front is too soft or too firm, and whether the main culprit in the less than perfect ride is the front or rear.

Personally, I find the front too firm and the rear to soft and the damping on both pretty poor. For comparison, I wheeled out my 2013 Bonneville this morning and put it side by side with the Scrambler. The Bonneville is another well priced, fun bike that also suffers from poor spec suspension out of the box. On the Bonneville it was simply too soft at both ends, coupled with poor damping. The front would simply crash about everywhere, whilst the rear simply gave up and bottomed out everytime it looked at a bump in the road. But, the two ends were better balanced than the Scrambler.

I had Racetech linear springs and Gold Valve Emulators installed in the front forks, along with 5w oil. The springs were about 25% firmer than standard and were the recommended spring for my weight / riding on the excellent Racetech website.

At the rear, I initially went with Hagon shocks sprung at their recommendation for my weight, but still suffered from them bottoming out. After a couple of changes to the springing they were better but still not as good as I hoped for. So I switched to a pair of shocks from the small, French suspension company Shock Factory, who do a great product for a very reasonable price, and these were excellent straight out of the box.

I've since put 5,000 miles on the suspension changes, from running around, to laps of Cadwell and the old, French, Linas-Montlhery circuit near Paris, and a trip round the Picos mountains in Spain. It's handled them all without a second thought about the suspension.

Side by side with the Scrambler, the Bonneville weighs in at almost 6 stones (38kgs) heavier! Despite this weight difference and the firmer than standard springs, the Scrambler front forks are still much firmer sprung.

At the rear, the Scrambler is much softer sprung than the Bonneville. Though in fairness, the Bonneville has much shorter suspension travel, so needs firmer springing to stop the bottoming. Even so, the Bonneville isn't harshly sprung at all.

So, to my mind, the Scrambler suspension needs to be softer sprung at the front, firmer at the rear, better matched, and with much improved damping. I don't think there is a simple solution to be had. It's going to need a new shock at the rear and a fork rebuild with new springs and revalve at the front. :(
 

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In my (and my behinds, 90kg) view the suspension is sporty and perfect for fast winding road work. Did you guys play with the tire pressure? If the front feels too harsh on bumps I would suggest try 2.2 bar instead of the 2.5 recommended. But watch your hubs!

Maybe some dealers put too much air... My dealer e.g. put 3 bar in my rear which was way too hard for a single ride.
 
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