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Is it not more easy And less dangerous to change the rear sprocket by a 44 tooth.????
If I could buy a lightweight steel rear 42 or 43 tooth sprocket I would probably do that. I want the full 6 or 8 % reduction in engine rpm. Don't particularly want to break the chain and deal with a master link. The thing I am most concerned with is removing the 16 tooth counter to go back to stock if I should want to. The Scrambler just feels like it's revving its guts out at 80 mph - even though I doubt it's hurting anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
If I could buy a lightweight steel rear 42 or 43 tooth sprocket I would probably do that. I want the full 6 or 8 % reduction in engine rpm. Don't particularly want to break the chain and deal with a master link. The thing I am most concerned with is removing the 16 tooth counter to go back to stock if I should want to. The Scrambler just feels like it's revving its guts out at 80 mph - even though I doubt it's hurting anything.
I just returned from another ride with the 16T sprocket and I'm still happy with how it runs :) You can do a rough before/after test at highway speeds by simply dropping from 6th to 5th gear. This gives roughly the same RPM/Road Speed relationship the Scrambler had with the stock 15T front sprocket in 6th gear. I may eventually go slightly taller with a rear sprocket change, but for my purposes a 45T or 44T would work.

As has been mentioned, the passenger peg bracket limits how far forward the front sprocket can be pulled during removal. I discovered that the sprocket first contacts a cylindrical shaped casting protrusion on the back of the bracket (see photo). I was able to get a little more removal clearance by filing this flush with the body of the bracket. I don't believe the protrusion contributes to the bracket strength so I wasn't concerned about removing some material. Again, I'd likely remove the bracket if I was doing it again, even though it means loosening the rear swing arm bolts etc.
 

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Changing your Gearing???

If you are going to change your gearing on your Scrambler by all means remove the footpeg bracket - makes sprocket removal and replacement super easy. You can have that footpeg bracket off in less than 5 minutes. You need a 24 mm socket and a 8 mm allen driver for the main bolts and a 5 mm allen with a 10 mm combination wrench for the little support bracket for the cat and shift linkage. No kidding it's a piece of cake. I removed about .020 of aluminum at the boss for the hydraulic clutch slave (tightest clearance spot). Happily one is not grinding on the engine cases - you are clearancing the stator cover. Not a big job at all.
:)
 

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Discussion Starter #64
If you are going to change your gearing on your Scrambler by all means remove the footpeg bracket - makes sprocket removal and replacement super easy. You can have that footpeg bracket off in less than 5 minutes. You need a 24 mm socket and a 8 mm allen driver for the main bolts and a 5 mm allen with a 10 mm combination wrench for the little support bracket for the cat and shift linkage. No kidding it's a piece of cake. I removed about .020 of aluminum at the boss for the hydraulic clutch slave (tightest clearance spot). Happily one is not grinding on the engine cases - you are clearancing the stator cover. Not a big job at all.
:)
I'm glad you chose to remove the footpeg bracket instead of my approach. I lacked the 8 mm driver at the time and wanted to get it done for a morning ride. I'll be interested to hear your impressions of the 16T sprocket once you've had some road time :)
 

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Rode only about 20 miles tonight - pretty much rained all day. 1st, 2nd and 3rd gear seem identical, in the higher gears it seems slightly less peppy. Never went for 7th gear like I did all the time with the 15 tooth counter. I am going to be out of town for a few days so no rides in the near future. I managed to see two police cars in the short ride but I was behaving myself. One of these days I'm going to get a serious speeding ticket, like 73 mph in a 45 mph zone, this bike begs to be ridden hard!
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Rode only about 20 miles tonight - pretty much rained all day. 1st, 2nd and 3rd gear seem identical, in the higher gears it seems slightly less peppy. Never went for 7th gear like I did all the time with the 15 tooth counter. I am going to be out of town for a few days so no rides in the near future. I managed to see two police cars in the short ride but I was behaving myself. One of these days I'm going to get a serious speeding ticket, like 73 mph in a 45 mph zone, this bike begs to be ridden hard!
Maybe the humidity from all the rain reduced the 'pep' factor ;) High humidity = lower air density + slower combustion, which tends to reduce power. In AZ the air is usually quite dry, and in cooler weather you can feel the power difference in the 'seat of your pants', especially on air cooled motorcycles :)
 

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Maybe the humidity from all the rain reduced the 'pep' factor ;) High humidity = lower air density + slower combustion, which tends to reduce power. In AZ the air is usually quite dry, and in cooler weather you can feel the power difference in the 'seat of your pants', especially on air cooled motorcycles :)
Ahhhh.....>:D the joy is back! I found the reason for the somewhat sluggish performance - I had adjusted the chain too tight! I am surprised at how different the Ducati feels now that I discovered my mistake. That wonderful free revving engine feels just as good as before only now I have a useful transmission able to provide a proper gear choice for every occasion. I would recommend the 16 tooth countershaft sprocket change to anyone, especially if you ever ride the bike on the freeway. If you like constantly shifting gears then maybe this modification isn't for you. The sprocket change is very easy to do do if you have a few common hand tools and are willing to remove your left foot peg bracket. It is also easily reversible if you want to return it to stock. Just don't over tighten your chain! Man I love this bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Ahhhh.....>:D the joy is back! I found the reason for the somewhat sluggish performance - I had adjusted the chain too tight! I am surprised at how different the Ducati feels now that I discovered my mistake. That wonderful free revving engine feels just as good as before only now I have a useful transmission able to provide a proper gear choice for every occasion. I would recommend the 16 tooth countershaft sprocket change to anyone, especially if you ever ride the bike on the freeway. If you like constantly shifting gears then maybe this modification isn't for you. The sprocket change is very easy to do do if you have a few common hand tools and are willing to remove your left foot peg bracket. It is also easily reversible if you want to return it to stock. Just don't over tighten your chain! Man I love this bike!

Glad to hear that :) After a couple of outings with the 16T front sprocket I can't see any reason to go back to stock. I experienced no difference in pulling power in top gear while going up a fairly steep grade outside my metro area. The larger front sprocket will also reduce sprocket/chain wear. Sure do agree about the bike...:)
 

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Scrambler_AZ, did you get the 16T sprocket and more importantly was there enough clearance for it to fit as I have read elsewhere that this may be an issue?
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Scrambler_AZ, did you get the 16T sprocket and more importantly was there enough clearance for it to fit as I have read elsewhere that this may be an issue?
Both igotone2 and I successfully mounted the 16T sprocket. There's barely enough clearance for the sprocket to fit without grinding some material away. I didn't grind any material but igotone2 did, and that's what I recommend to anyone else. Read through the thread and you'll have a good overview of the details for the modification. I posted pictures of where the fit is close on page 5, but only one is a concern. The attached photo & note shows the area where igotone2 ground away some material.

Regardless of how you do it, I believe that raising the overall gear ratio on the Scrambler is a worthwhile modification. Acceleration wise you'll still have all 'The Joy' and it will reduce wear and tear on the engine, sprocket and chain :) And if you care it may possibly improve the top speed, but there's plenty of Joy well below that!
 

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Discussion Starter #72
great stuff, thanks for the info & photo
You're welcome :) I'll post as warranted if I learn anything else, like top speed with the 16T, which is my only remaining mystery ;) Otherwise I'm just enjoying a more relaxed engine on a still energetic Scambler...
 

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Just swapped out the stock front sprocket for the 16 tooth today - as stated by a lot of people here, its a big improvement.
 

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You're welcome :) I'll post as warranted if I learn anything else, like top speed with the 16T, which is my only remaining mystery ;) Otherwise I'm just enjoying a more relaxed engine on a still energetic Scambler...
I'm not so much interested in top speed as I am accelerating from say 60 mph to 90 mph. Do you have a sense of how the switch to a 16T sprocket has affected performance in that range? If it has improved, I definitely will attempt the swap myself or have the dealer do it. Thanks for keeping us up-to-date on your progress Scrambler_AZ.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
I'm not so much interested in top speed as I am accelerating from say 60 mph to 90 mph. Do you have a sense of how the switch to a 16T sprocket has affected performance in that range? If it has improved, I definitely will attempt the swap myself or have the dealer do it. Thanks for keeping us up-to-date on your progress Scrambler_AZ.
Qualifying my answer, without a timed before/after run or an accelerometer I can't provide data about the performance from 60 to 90 mph. It's not unusual for a change to a taller overall final ratio to reduce acceleration in any specific gear. I was willing to accept this in top gear in order to 'relax' the Scrambler.

But my 'sense' is that I haven't lost any noticeable acceleration in sixth gear and now have a more relaxed engine. It's also possible the acceleration has improved, but again, no before/after data. The Scrambler engine has strong mid range punch, giving it a nice acceleration profile in taller gears at sub 100 mph speeds ;)

My particular mission was accomplished: I wanted to relax the motor a bit in top gear, leave the possibility for more by changing the rear sprocket, and keep the stock chain length. With the 16T front sprocket a neat side benefit is there seems to be no change in Joy...:)
 

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I've always felt the gearing was a little short. Has anyone tried just changing down the rear sprocket to the 44? Still sounds simpler and safer to me than pushing the clearances, to get a bit taller gearing.

I am due first service soon and wondering about asking them to make this change so they can tension the chain correctly while they're at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #77
I've always felt the gearing was a little short. Has anyone tried just changing down the rear sprocket to the 44? Still sounds simpler and safer to me than pushing the clearances, to get a bit taller gearing.

I am due first service soon and wondering about asking them to make this change so they can tension the chain correctly while they're at it.
This rear sprocket swap out to a 44T was posted in a different forum:
Rear sprocket tip :) | Ducati Scrambler Forum

There were several concerns raised about this particular swap:
1. Replacement is aluminum - some prefer steel for strength and wear characteristics.
2. Chain adjusters were moved significantly, maybe not far from the limit. This leaves less room for adjustment as the chain stretches with road miles.

It's possible a dealer may balk at switching to a 16T given that the additional clearance requires modification, however safe that might be. The choices are definitely an owner's judgment call. Nothing's ever 'simple' but we do still have freedom of choice ;)
 

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Yes, an aluminum sprocket is definitely not something that anyone who puts any kind of mileage on this bike would want, and was the primary reason for me electing to swap out the front instead.

Very happy with the results.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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I just posted up a full "how-to" (with pics) on this at my personal blog. Many thanks to AZ_SCRAMBLER for being the first to try this, and lending some pictures for this tutorial.

See it HERE.
 

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So, it's been a month since many of you have put on the 16T sprockets. I'm noticing a tendency to reach for "7th" gear as well and, as we've got mostly highways in my neck of the woods, am seriously considering going up a tooth up front. I'm just curious if anyone's noticed any wear on the problem areas, and if you still think it's worth it to try. Thanks!!
 
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