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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone.

I made my own exhaust today and decided to remove the canister at the same time.

The canister removal can be done in 5 minutes if you are slow, or in two minutes if you have all the tools ready.

Step one.
Cust this hose here

I cut it about 2-3 inches from the can. That way if you ever need to hook it bac up, you just need a 1/8" male barb to barb fitting from Autozone (85 cents).

Step 2.

Pop the can out of its bracket. There are two tabs on the top that you push in while sliding the can up. It takes very little pressure and pops right off.
You can see them in this picture. Two black tangs.

Then cut the vent hose coming from the tank to the can.
You ant to cut this as close to the can as you can because you need all the length you can get as this hose will be fed down as low as possible.
When you (stupidly) overflow your fuel tank, fuel will flow out of this hose.
Its best to keep it away from a hot engine.

I fed it down by the oil cooler lines and out of sight.



Step 3.

With all that done, there should be one more hose stuck to the canister.
It goes down, and then up.
Leave that attatched to the can.

No just follow that hose and pull it out so the can is free to be removed.


Step 4.

Remove the bracket.
It is pretty straight forward, a two year old may need a minute or so to do this.



An allen wrench is all you need. 3mm or 4mm, I cant remember.

Keep one of the screws for the next step!!!


Step 5.

Take one of the screws that mounted the bracket to the frame and dip it in silicone or some other suitable material.
I usd rtv form a gasket cuz thats what I had laying around and it was black.
Once you go black, you never go back. Eh, ladies?

At this point, you should have two black hoses dangling on the bike.
The first one that you cut - which if you followed leads to the intake manifold, and not to the tank, gets the screw.
Mind you, it will be the smaller of the two hoses.
Again, the idea is to make this air tight, so use an adhesive that achieves this.




In this picture, the screw is dry, and not coated with silicone.
It should be pretty gooey.

The other hose, the one that comes from the gas tank is free to stay open as it is the vent.

If you are confused as to which hose should get the screw...

STOP!

Return your bike to the dealer and go take up bowling.

If you are not confused, rock on!

D
 

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Thank you! This should work well for folks who may have to put the thing back on for inspection or what have you.


Sarah
The only state that requires it is California. Those of us in the other 49 states will never need it again, unless you sell it to somebody in CA, in which case you may need to spend a few minutes putting it back together. That's why I took mine all the way off, including the nipple on the throttle body. It's cleaner and only takes an extra 5-10 minutes.
 

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Scrambler DIY Guru
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I'm surprised with the cost savings measures they've already taken with the bike that there isn't a California model and a 49 state model like my W650. That way they'd be saving money by not putting it on a majority of the USA bound bikes. Perhaps there's some newer generalized DOT law now though.
 

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I'm surprised with the cost savings measures they've already taken with the bike that there isn't a California model and a 49 state model like my W650. That way they'd be saving money by not putting it on a majority of the USA bound bikes. Perhaps there's some newer generalized DOT law now though.
I can confirm that all NA bikes have them including the ones in Mexico. So just because of California all the other bikes being sold have to have it.
 

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Great write-up DK. Thanks for taking the time to post that. I've done it on 2 Monsters and a Streetfighter recently. Scrambler will be next!
 

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644 Posts
Hello everyone.

I made my own exhaust today and decided to remove the canister at the same time.

The canister removal can be done in 5 minutes if you are slow, or in two minutes if you have all the tools ready.

Step one.
Cust this hose here

I cut it about 2-3 inches from the can. That way if you ever need to hook it bac up, you just need a 1/8" male barb to barb fitting from Autozone (85 cents).

Step 2.

Pop the can out of its bracket. There are two tabs on the top that you push in while sliding the can up. It takes very little pressure and pops right off.
You can see them in this picture. Two black tangs.

Then cut the vent hose coming from the tank to the can.
You ant to cut this as close to the can as you can because you need all the length you can get as this hose will be fed down as low as possible.
When you (stupidly) overflow your fuel tank, fuel will flow out of this hose.
Its best to keep it away from a hot engine.

I fed it down by the oil cooler lines and out of sight.



Step 3.

With all that done, there should be one more hose stuck to the canister.
It goes down, and then up.
Leave that attatched to the can.

No just follow that hose and pull it out so the can is free to be removed.


Step 4.

Remove the bracket.
It is pretty straight forward, a two year old may need a minute or so to do this.



An allen wrench is all you need. 3mm or 4mm, I cant remember.

Keep one of the screws for the next step!!!


Step 5.

Take one of the screws that mounted the bracket to the frame and dip it in silicone or some other suitable material.
I usd rtv form a gasket cuz thats what I had laying around and it was black.
Once you go black, you never go back. Eh, ladies?

At this point, you should have two black hoses dangling on the bike.
The first one that you cut - which if you followed leads to the intake manifold, and not to the tank, gets the screw.
Mind you, it will be the smaller of the two hoses.
Again, the idea is to make this air tight, so use an adhesive that achieves this.




In this picture, the screw is dry, and not coated with silicone.
It should be pretty gooey.

The other hose, the one that comes from the gas tank is free to stay open as it is the vent.

If you are confused as to which hose should get the screw...

STOP!

Return your bike to the dealer and go take up bowling.

If you are not confused, rock on!

D
Thank you! I hope to save, or rather be able to find, your step by step pictorial. I plan to remove it myself. Looks easy! Thanks:D
I don't even know what its for, is it related to emissions?
 

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I can confirm that all NA bikes have them including the ones in Mexico. So just because of California all the other bikes being sold have to have it.

**** California. Maybe if everyone from the East Coast and Midwest got together we could push that sad excuse for a State right into the Pacific Ocean................no wait, I live in California.:crying:
 

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The only state that requires it is California. Those of us in the other 49 states will never need it again, unless you sell it to somebody in CA, in which case you may need to spend a few minutes putting it back together. That's why I took mine all the way off, including the nipple on the throttle body. It's cleaner and only takes an extra 5-10 minutes.
you wont need it in California. there's no one around besides you the seller and the buyer at the point of sale. no inspections required. have sold 3 bikes since 2010 and no problems, no inspections.
 

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644 Posts
Hello everyone.

I made my own exhaust today and decided to remove the canister at the same time.

The canister removal can be done in 5 minutes if you are slow, or in two minutes if you have all the tools ready.

Step one.
Cust this hose here

I cut it about 2-3 inches from the can. That way if you ever need to hook it bac up, you just need a 1/8" male barb to barb fitting from Autozone (85 cents).

Step 2.

Pop the can out of its bracket. There are two tabs on the top that you push in while sliding the can up. It takes very little pressure and pops right off.
You can see them in this picture. Two black tangs.

Then cut the vent hose coming from the tank to the can.
You ant to cut this as close to the can as you can because you need all the length you can get as this hose will be fed down as low as possible.
When you (stupidly) overflow your fuel tank, fuel will flow out of this hose.
Its best to keep it away from a hot engine.

I fed it down by the oil cooler lines and out of sight.



Step 3.

With all that done, there should be one more hose stuck to the canister.
It goes down, and then up.
Leave that attatched to the can.

No just follow that hose and pull it out so the can is free to be removed.


Step 4.

Remove the bracket.
It is pretty straight forward, a two year old may need a minute or so to do this.



An allen wrench is all you need. 3mm or 4mm, I cant remember.

Keep one of the screws for the next step!!!


Step 5.

Take one of the screws that mounted the bracket to the frame and dip it in silicone or some other suitable material.
I usd rtv form a gasket cuz thats what I had laying around and it was black.
Once you go black, you never go back. Eh, ladies?

At this point, you should have two black hoses dangling on the bike.
The first one that you cut - which if you followed leads to the intake manifold, and not to the tank, gets the screw.
Mind you, it will be the smaller of the two hoses.
Again, the idea is to make this air tight, so use an adhesive that achieves this.




In this picture, the screw is dry, and not coated with silicone.
It should be pretty gooey.

The other hose, the one that comes from the gas tank is free to stay open as it is the vent.

If you are confused as to which hose should get the screw...

STOP!

Return your bike to the dealer and go take up bowling.

If you are not confused, rock on!

D
hey D K, is yours an Icon?
 

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I just removed the canister from my UE and for anyone doing this, you have to remove the front fender to get to the top bolt on the oil cooler guard.

I actually started to get rid of all the system and try to plug the throttle body and found it to be really tight in there. I ended up moving the oil cooler to the side and also unclipping a couple of sensors to get a bit more room. I managed to unclip the hose with long needle nose pliers and get a socket with a knuckle to remove the nipple from the body. Well could I get the new bolt started in the body to plug it....no way, I just couldn't get in there For me the angle just wasn't working even with a knuckle socket. So after cursing for an hour I decided to put the hose back on and just plug the end of it like this example. I actually put connected the hose back onto the nipple and sort of used it as a flexible screwdriver to get the nipple started again....phew. I thought I was in the ****.

So right now I have this method but with no cut back hoses. I just routed them down with the rest of the others.


It looks much cleaner without the canister for sure.
 
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