Ducati Scrambler Forum banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Scrambler DIY Guru
Joined
·
979 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hopefully this will help people decide if they want to change their own oil or not.

A few thoughts of my own about doing this and the things I encountered that bothered me a bit: Removing the exhaust requires a bit of finesse because you don't want to put undue stress on any part of the pipes. Having proper tools to do this will make your life easier and won't damage the bike. Ducati oil filters (and aftermarket ones) like to leak and you need to put them on tighter than other bikes. If you don't have a good way to put the filter on tight, beware. The factory torque applied to the side plug that covers the mesh filter and the torque applied to the mesh filter was excessive. To the tune of about 100 foot pounds. You WILL need a 1/2" breaker bar and 14mm socket to remove them. An L shaped Allen wrench will not work without a cheater bar.

OK, that's it. Everything else was straightforward mechanic 101 stuff. Have your bike somehow upright. I use a front wheel chock stand. You may opt to use a paddock stand on the back wheel or some other means.

Start by removing the 5mm hex bolt on the left side of the muffler that attaches it to the hanger. There are two top hat shaped metal spacers in either side of the rubber mount. Don't lose them. In my case they never came out.



Remove the spring that holds the muffler onto the exhaust pipe. I used Vise Grips to remove and reinstall all of my springs. There's probably a proper tool to do this, so if you have one, use that instead.



NOTE: You may want to put a piece of masking tape on the aluminum heat shield of your muffler OR remove it from the muffler so you don't scratch it. I didn't scratch mine, but it was a tight fit removing the bolt here.

Remove the 5mm hex bolt from the right side of the muffler and be ready to support the muffler with your hand. I was wearing leather gloves because the bike was still warm and the muffler was HOT.



Use finesse to wiggle the muffler back and away from the exhaust pipe. It's a double wall pipe fit, so it may be a bit stubborn. Don't bend it back and forth. Sit the muffler aside and collect those metal top hat spacers from the rubber mounting point on the right side so you don't lose them.



Remove the two springs from the exhaust collector pipe section. Note that they are two different lengths. The one closest to you is shorter than the one closer to the engine. I used a rubber tipped hammer to tap (gently) on the upper section to release the collector. This wasn't difficult or stubborn in my case.



If you have installed a belly pan or if it came with the bike, you need to remove it as well as the bracket that lives on the right side of the engine. Point A signifies the 4mm hex screw you need to remove to remove the bracket. The other bolts holding on the belly pan are also 4mm.



Here's what we're after. Oil filter A and mesh filter plug B.



Now get ready to drain the engine oil into a suitable catch pan. There will be 3+ Quarts / Liters of oil splashing out almost immediately, so prepare yourself. Make note that the drain plug is in the middle of the engine. I've marked it in the photo. Don't remove either of the two other plugs. This plug is 5mm hex and I used a 3/8" socket on a ratchet rather than my T handled hex driver.



Let the oil drain. It probably won't ever stop trickling out. Make sure not to lose the copper washer for the drain plug. Mine stayed stuck to the engine and I reused it. You may opt to use a new one if you're a stickler for perfection and want to safeguard against possible leaks. Examine your oil plug which has a magnet on it. Mine had some metal shavings on it which is to be expected.



Remove the oil filter and drain that oil into the drain pan. If you have the factory Ducati oil filter remover tool, use that. I just used a set of oil filter pliers and didn't have any issues. They only worked because I had the exhaust system removed. Not every oil change requires checking the mesh filter on the side of the engine, so you don't have to normally remove the exhaust.



Remove the mesh filter cover plug. It's 14mm hex and I had to use a 1/2" breaker bar with a hex socket on it. It was installed very tight. Make note that there's a thin nickel washer that seals the plug to the engine.



Sit the plug and washer aside and use the same 14mm socket to remove the mesh filter housing itself. It's also installed very tightly. I don't recommend putting either of these items back onto the bike so tightly. I also installed my new oil filter. K&N 153 does fit, but NOTE: It is longer than OEM and the nut on the bottom adds further length. My belly pan is now resting solidly against the oil filter. It doesn't seem to be an issue, but make note of it. Also make note that the Ducati engines seem to prefer the oil filter to be on TIGHTLY, otherwise the filter will leak. Upon refilling the oil and starting the bike, it was leaking so I had to tighten the oil filter more than I thought I would have to.



My mesh filter had a few chunks of unknown debris on it. Nothing worrisome, but I did take the time to clean it carefully and completely for the reinstall.





My oil looked a bit scary. Like a human brain sitting in the oil pan. Lots of metal shavings that look like brass to me. I've kept the oil in a clean container to possibly be sent to an oil analysis firm. I presume this is normal, but I'm not sure, having never owned a new motorcycle in my life.



Now that you have your oil filter in place, the mesh filter and associated cap refitted, and the oil drain plug back in place... Reassemble the exhaust system. It took a bit of finesse to get everything refitted and get the muffler back into place safe and sound. Fill the bike with oil. I'd recommend something like Motul 7100 10W40 fully synthetic. Fill the bike to the full mark.



Start the bike and watch the oil filter for leaks. Mine leaked. I had to tighten the oil filter more to stop it from leaking. (It has not leaked since I did it, 100 miles ago.) Once you're satisfied that the bike is building oil pressure and that it's running right, shut the bike down and let the oil level settle. Add oil to the proper full mark.



Finally, finish by putting the belly pan back on and you're done. Also think about the fact that your dealer may charge you 300 dollars to do all of this, but it may make sense to give you the peace of mind that it was done properly and that you didn't have to purchase all of the tools I already own :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Thank you for the effort in clicking pictures in 'oily conditions' and sharing here with the superb write up. Much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Very good write up. Thanks for taking the time. After the first oil change (which I believe the dealer has to do), I'll follow suit and do them my self.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Thank you so much for this effort to sharing all details..

What did you use for cleaning the mesh filter? Gasoline or something?
 

·
Scrambler DIY Guru
Joined
·
979 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
To clean the mesh filter, the service manual says to blow it out with compressed air from behind. I just used a rag because it was pretty much like new. Those were probably chunks of engine sealer and whatnot.

The mesh filter is made of plastic, but the threaded part is a durable metal bolt. I didn't want to dump gas or any other solvent on it because I don't know how durable they are.

Apparently, you're supposed to check it every other oil change. I imagine it'll be rare to ever see anything on it from this point forward. Metal shavings would easily pass through it. There's a hex bolt on the bottom of the engine that opens up to that filter housing, so you could be lazy and pull that to inspect the general condition from below! In fact, that's probably what I'll be doing from now on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Thanks silver, much appreciated!

Same q as brendan...did they not clean the mesh at 600?
 

·
Scrambler DIY Guru
Joined
·
979 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I didn't take it to the dealer. The service icon is still on the display. This was my service at 625 miles. I'm at about 725 miles after coming home tonight and the bike is still lovely so I don't think I hurt it :)

My dealer is 40 miles away and back logged with Ducatis all summer because he's the only shop in the state. I don't have time for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Do you have any idea what the plug is for to the right of the drain plug (as viewed in your picture).

When on its side stand this is the lowest point of the oil pan, I wonder if they made a separate drain for working on its side stand?
 

·
Scrambler DIY Guru
Joined
·
979 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I'm not sure. I don't go removing mystery plugs after the Great Lost Ball and Spring Valve Incident of 2008.
 

·
Scrambler DIY Guru
Joined
·
979 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
It looks like your hunch is correct from what I can see in this photo of the engine case internals. It is probably a kick stand oil plug. There is no magnet on it like the primary oil plug, but it looks like it's a way to get all of the oil out of the bike if it's on the side stand. As with most bikes, changing the oil while on a side or center stand usually means creative oil-drainage pathways to your drain pain.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
That's good to know! I'll use it next time. I noticed when changing my oil that it does not have a copper washer on it so might be worth getting one before hand so it seals back up good!

The magnet on the centre plug will still do its job, just remove that too during the oil change for cleaning, or even better, swap them (if the thread matches)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
I intend to follow the motorman break in, so I changed the oil at the 75km mark. At least one of his statements is true, the oil already had several visible tiny scraps of metal and so did the magnetic part of the drain plug. I couldn't imagine riding the bike for another 900 kms with this kind of gunk floating in the oil.

I didn't remove the mesh filter. Will get the service centre folks to do it when I go for the 1000km service.

It seems that my local service centre has issues in sourcing the recommended Shell Advance oil, so between now and the first service I need to figure out which oil to source.

The store I purchased the Motul oil asked me not to switch to 300V type of oil till I had at least 3000 kms on the odo. According to him, 300V is double ester full synthetic racing oriented oil and both (racing and the oil itself) are not recommended till the engine is fully broken in. In the Motul range his recommendation for first service was the single ester 7100 or any other semi synthetic.

But then, here is the official Motul recommendations chart in use locally which only recommends 300V for Ducati:



Another Ducati rider told me to source Agip Tec 4T 15W50 semi synthetic for regular urban use. anyone here has any experiences with Agip oil?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Great write-up! I would just like to add one thing, if I may.

On mine, the cap for the mesh filter appeared to have pipe dope on the threads. I ignored it and continued on with the oil change. I really wish I hadn't, because I'm leaking there, despite going back and tightening the cap again. Looks like I'm going to have to drain and refill. Ymmv, but it's better to be safe than sorry.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19 Posts
Excellent!

Awesome write up!

Doing the motoman as well and did my complete change , including screen, at 30 miles.

Out with the brains and in with motul 15w50 plus my favorie high powered magnet.

 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top