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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking forward to front and rear suspension options for the Scrambler from some of the top companies. Matris, Ohlins, etc. Fork cartridge kit in the front would be great too. I have Matris on my V7 and it's great. They're not as popular as Ohlins but just as good, if not better. And they're Italian. That will be one of my first upgrades, besides exhaust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have you experienced the stock suspension at all? What are you hoping for by switching to aftermarket suspension?
No I have not...I'm in the States and bikes haven't arrived yet, so no test ride. Yes, that may sound premature to say before test riding one, but almost always the suspension is one of the first upgrades that really makes a difference, unless the bike is already high spec with very good components. It's not jsut the quality of the suspension but having front and rear spec'd for your weight, and riding style.

I know the suspension on my V7 stone was **** stock. I upgraded significantly in the rear and, while it was expensive, it was worth it. I put Matris twin shocks in the back which were about $1100USD, but the front only needed a fork kit from Matris that just replaces the internals at around $250-$350USD depending on if you need a new spring. Completely changes the handling of the bike. Also, having compression, preload, damping options vastly improves the ability to dial it in just right, couple that with a setup designed for your weight and it's the best investment.

The stock setup might be adequate, especially for riders within it's weight limits. I'm pretty light so I might be able to dial in the rear ok in the beginning, but eventually I will upgrade.
 

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No I have not...I'm in the States and bikes haven't arrived yet, so no test ride. Yes, that may sound premature to say before test riding one, but almost always the suspension is one of the first upgrades that really makes a difference, unless the bike is already high spec with very good components. It's not jsut the quality of the suspension but having front and rear spec'd for your weight, and riding style.

I know the suspension on my V7 stone was **** stock. I upgraded significantly in the rear and, while it was expensive, it was worth it. I put Matris twin shocks in the back which were about $1100USD, but the front only needed a fork kit from Matris that just replaces the internals at around $250-$350USD depending on if you need a new spring. Completely changes the handling of the bike. Also, having compression, preload, damping options vastly improves the ability to dial it in just right, couple that with a setup designed for your weight and it's the best investment.

The stock setup might be adequate, especially for riders within it's weight limits. I'm pretty light so I might be able to dial in the rear ok in the beginning, but eventually I will upgrade.
+100


Suspension set up properly for your weight is the biggest improvement you can make on a bike. IF it already comes with premium suspension, having it sprung for your weight still makes a difference. Adjustability is important for riding different surfaces.
 

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Hi there,

How will aftermarket suspension differ from the stock suspension? Is it worth all the work to change them out?

The only way you'll know that Timmy is to ride the stock bike. If you're happy with it then fine, if not you can spend anything from a couple of hundred pounds to a few thousand to change the stock set up. After market rear suspension will typically give you much more adjustability and may well give you easier access to changing the pre load.


With the front end there's plenty you can do starting with just changing the fork oil up to changing the whole front end for something like a fully adjustable set of Ohlins forks.


How much you spend depends on your wallet and how badly you want to change your set up but a stock bike can be absolutely transformed for not a great deal of money. If you spend half a day getting your suspension set perfectly for you, you'll reap the benefits.


I disagree about it being the best change you can make to a bike though, the best change you can make to any bike is to the rider and that is to get training that will enable you to really use your bike, as a national observer with the IAM I see so many riders with the latest sportsbikes who don't have a clue how to use what they've got you wouldn't believe it.



Jerry
 

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The only way you'll know that Timmy is to ride the stock bike. If you're happy with it then fine, if not you can spend anything from a couple of hundred pounds to a few thousand to change the stock set up. After market rear suspension will typically give you much more adjustability and may well give you easier access to changing the pre load.


With the front end there's plenty you can do starting with just changing the fork oil up to changing the whole front end for something like a fully adjustable set of Ohlins forks.


How much you spend depends on your wallet and how badly you want to change your set up but a stock bike can be absolutely transformed for not a great deal of money. If you spend half a day getting your suspension set perfectly for you, you'll reap the benefits.


I disagree about it being the best change you can make to a bike though, the best change you can make to any bike is to the rider and that is to get training that will enable you to really use your bike, as a national observer with the IAM I see so many riders with the latest sportsbikes who don't have a clue how to use what they've got you wouldn't believe it.



Jerry
I was at our Monster club trackday at Mallory Park and Chris Wallker the Stalker turns up because its his local track for some leathers and decides to join in the fun. Got straight on a unmodified Ducati classic GT1000 with road tyres and blitzes everbody on race bikes and the track instructors. Its all about the rider coping with the bike. Not saying the bike cant be bettered but it shouldn't be bad. I think I will actually take a bike safe course. I probably would benefit from one


 

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I was at our Monster club trackday at Mallory Park and Chris Wallker the Stalker turns up because its his local track for some leathers and decides to join in the fun. Got straight on a unmodified Ducati classic GT1000 with road tyres and blitzes everbody on race bikes and the track instructors. Its all about the rider coping with the bike. Not saying the bike cant be bettered but it shouldn't be bad. I think I will actually take a bike safe course. I probably would benefit from one



Couldn't agree more Albie, Stalker knows how to ride a bike and I'm sure the bike'll be fine in stock form. Bikesafe is a good day out and you'll get some great advice.


Jerry
 

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Have you experienced the stock suspension at all? What are you hoping for by switching to aftermarket suspension?
I just got back from getting my red icon...
and boy those suspensions are... HARD ... on the same road as I'm used to go with my 2010 MTS Ohlins + Upgrade.... there's a world of diference..

I hope I find a way to get at least the front to behave properly !
 

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I just got back from getting my red icon...
and boy those suspensions are... HARD ... on the same road as I'm used to go with my 2010 MTS Ohlins + Upgrade.... there's a world of diference..

I hope I find a way to get at least the front to behave properly !
That's what i noticed at the show i recently went to, even with just messing around with the suspension at the show i felt it being just like that.
 

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I just got back from getting my red icon...
and boy those suspensions are... HARD ... on the same road as I'm used to go with my 2010 MTS Ohlins + Upgrade.... there's a world of diference..

I hope I find a way to get at least the front to behave properly !

Don't want to be intrusive, but I'm wondering how much you weigh, Cristovao? You can message me if you don't want to go public. Can you say whether the suspension is hard and doesn't even sag when you sit on it, or whether you're bottoming out? And which position the rear spring was adjusted to? I weigh 130 including boots and armored jacket, so I'm imagining my experience may be a bit different from the targeted rider's.
 

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Don't want to be intrusive, but I'm wondering how much you weigh, Cristovao? You can message me if you don't want to go public. Can you say whether the suspension is hard and doesn't even sag when you sit on it, or whether you're bottoming out? And which position the rear spring was adjusted to? I weigh 130 including boots and armored jacket, so I'm imagining my experience may be a bit different from the targeted rider's.
I'm about 65 Kg.

The thing is i never imagined the diference to be SO BIG comparing to the MTS.

But as it as been raining since friday night I haven't ride it again... but this week i'll be using it a lot more.
 
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