Ducati Scrambler Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
First post on this forum although I've been lurking for awhile. I'm currently riding a BMW 800 GS and I prefer adventure riding with at least a 50/50 mix of dirt and asphalt. I like the GS, but it is just too heavy for me in tricky off-road situations. I'm 57, weigh 150 pounds, and 5'8" tall.

I also ride and race dirt bikes and still ride at the A level when I compete. While I like the 800, I'm ready to get a different bike. I like the KTM 690 but don't like its highway manners. The Scrambler seems to fill the void in between the 690 and the 800, and should be better on the road than the 690.

I know the Scrambler will need suspension upgrades for dirt use, but the modest price leaves me with money to do that. My questions are:
1. How competent is the Scrambler in the dirt?
2. How much ground clearance does it have?

I previously owned a 2007 Multistrada 1100, and I really miss the torquey power of that bike. But it was just not able to handle the dirt riding that I wanted to do, so I sold it and bought the BMW. Thanks up front for your feedback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
I can't imagine the Scrambler being a true 50/50 dual sport adventure bike. The wheels are just too big and clunky. While it has a very nice seat height to flat foot easily, it also lacks ground clearance and sturdy features of a real bash guard. But that doesn't mean you can't try. I saw some videos posted of guys taking the Scrambler on some gnarly adventures. More abuse than the bike was intended for and they managed to survive, failed to complete their goal.

I subscribe to the notion that there is no perfect all purpose bike for everybody. That's a unicorn. But buying the bike closest to your needs is achievable.

I love my scrambler and have ridden it in crazy rain, highway, and gravel roads. I have avoided rivers, streams and mud because I know my limits and my wallet is empty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
iv ridden mine on dirt roads ,gravel tracks and through woodland paths , iits not to heavy and the seats low,its a bit like an old 650 triumph ,however the rear wheels too wide and the fronts too small diameter for serious stuff and the ground clearance ,suspension would also become a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
How about the new Multistrada Enduro? Scrambler will be a bit of a stretch for such applications IMO.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
These two gentlemen explain very well the nature of the scramblers compared to adventure-enduros with more suspension-travel,ground clearance, steering-lock etc.

With a 690 you would face less problems going bumpy offroad and pass over logs/rocks.

But you would miss the low height/COG of the scrambler on the road. On flat gravel I think a scrambler has the potential to beat all the others riding the high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Correct. That was the video I was referring to. It was instrumental in my decision to purchase the Scrambler. I knew I would never do what they did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
IMO, the Scrambler can do safely a light off-road, not enduro level.
I too have seen some videos where it does incredible things, but I haven't seen the bike the day after ;-). I love my Scrambler and I want to ride it for long.
Take a look here:
http://www.swm-motorcycles.it/
I had a SWM 347 (2 strokes 347cc Rotax engine): it was my great love when I was younger :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the feedback. In reply to some of your posts:
Outofthebox - I'm trying to get away from heavy adventure bikes. I see the new Multi Enduro as just another top heavy bike that will weigh over 500 pounds ready to ride. Plus, I believe it's ridiculous to have that much power in the dirt. It will make a great sport touring bike, though.

Electromoto - I've seen that video and it made an impression on me. I have a place up in Colorado near the trails that they ride in that video. I've ridden most of those trails on real dirt bikes. They are gnarly and rocky, so I'm impressed they rode those bikes there.

Egicar - That SWM adventure bike looks amazing! Too bad you can't buy it in the USA. Or, at least, not that I'm aware of.

Xtyling - you're right, there is no perfect adventure bike. Everything is a compromise. It kind of depends on what you and your buddies decide the route will be. In my circle of friends, we have everything from a 690 to a 1200 GS. So while the 690 rider is unchallenged on most rides, the 1200 rider is having a white-knuckle experience.

Here is my idea of the perfect adventure bike:
1. Weighs less than 450 pounds fueled and ready to ride. My BMW 800 is closer to 525 pounds, and that's without a lot of luggage.
2. Has at least 75 horsepower.
3. Handles nicely in the dirt, but still is comfortable for at least 100 miles of continuous pavement.
4. Has a bigger front wheel than 17". That rules out bikes like the Hyperstrada.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
From your response, I think the Scrambler may fit your needs..

Here are 2 pictures of my Icon.
Changed handlebar to Renthal Street Ultra Low.
Evotech Oil cooler and Engine Bash Guards.
SW Motech Engine Crash Guard.
Denali D4 Lights (Using Denali Fork Bracket Mounts)
Generic Federal LED lights mounted onto SW Motech Crash guards.
Denali Power Hub 2 (Under the seat)
Givi E21N Hard Side Cases mounted with Givi SB2000 brackets (bent and shaped at my local machine shop)
Custom Slip On Exhaust (to get the exit air away from my side case)
Painted or anodized a few parts here and there for cosmetic reasons.
Unbranded eBay Brake and Clutch levers.

Waiting in my garage for installation:
Tutoro Chain Oiler
16T front sprocket
Tail Tidy

For 2016:
Rexxer remap
Seat upgrade
Suspension upgrade (if seat upgrade isn't enough)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
I think 50% of your concerns could be addressed with a front suspension/front wheel swap out (to 19 or 21"). I expect sooner or later someone will bolt the triple clamps/forks off some offroad bike onto a Ducati Scrambler and the issues we have with going offroad will be significantly less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
First post on this forum although I've been lurking for awhile. I'm currently riding a BMW 800 GS and I prefer adventure riding with at least a 50/50 mix of dirt and asphalt. I like the GS, but it is just too heavy for me in tricky off-road situations. I'm 57, weigh 150 pounds, and 5'8" tall.

I also ride and race dirt bikes and still ride at the A level when I compete. While I like the 800, I'm ready to get a different bike. I like the KTM 690 but don't like its highway manners. The Scrambler seems to fill the void in between the 690 and the 800, and should be better on the road than the 690.

I know the Scrambler will need suspension upgrades for dirt use, but the modest price leaves me with money to do that. My questions are:
1. How competent is the Scrambler in the dirt?
2. How much ground clearance does it have?

I previously owned a 2007 Multistrada 1100, and I really miss the torquey power of that bike. But it was just not able to handle the dirt riding that I wanted to do, so I sold it and bought the BMW. Thanks up front for your feedback.
The Scrambler is great off road, even on rough stuff! You just need to keep your speed slow as the suspension is weak off road and the ground clearance is minimal. This means you need to stiffen up the rear shocks and put some thicker fork oil in, ATF works great. Then you need to get a good skid plate or remount the original unit with a solid mounting system or you will crush your oil filter.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top