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Having owned my red Icon for 9 days now, I reckon it's high time that I posted my opinion of this bike. (For comparison purposes, this is the 8th bike that I've owned, having mainly ridden Triumphs in the past. I love 'modern classic' bikes, have a real soft spot for the Bonneville range and my other bike is an R nineT).

The first thing that shocked me about the Scrambler is how light it feels, especially comparing it to the Bonneville which is around 40kg heavier. I'm still running the Scrambler in, but can already appreciate the significant acceleration advantage over the Bonnie - this thing is properly quick off the mark and has its power coming in at very usable road-riding speeds.

In terms of comfort, the rider triangle on this bike fits me like a glove, (I'm only 5'6" with a 29" inseam). The bars are noticeably wider than its main competitors, and as they're combined with a relatively low weight it's incredible how easy it is to drop the bike into turns. I took her along the Macclesfield to Buxton road last week, with a mate of mine on his Street Triple. I was taking it easy but he was struggling to keep up! The Scrambler feels absolutely at home on the twisties - I had a seriously big grin on my boat by the time I got to the bottom of the Cat & Fiddle road...

I've done a little bit of commuting on the bike and can report that it's fantastic in and out of traffic. Nipping past cars is effortless, especially in comparison with the Bonneville due to its advantageous power-to-weight ratio and the torque peaking so low down in the rev-range.

The only real criticisms I can think of regarding this bike are the somewhat disappointing exhaust note, (my nineT's stock exhaust sounds beautiful, so I don't know why other manufacturers can't push the EU restriction envelope further towards its limit - anyway - nothing a new exhaust can't fix). My only other criticism is the number of false neutrals that I'm finding. Having said that, I think my problem may be partly to do with me not being positive enough with some of my upshifts, (the gearbox is pretty agricultural and I'm also nursing an injured left ankle so that may be contributing towards the problem).

All in all then, I can't praise this bike highly enough. For what it costs this is an absolute bargain - I can honestly say that I've never enjoyed riding any other bikes as much as this one, (that's praise indeed, as I include my amazing R nineT in that statement). I can't wait to start tweaking a few parts...(my initial priorities are going to be heated grips and a throatier exhaust).

For all of you about to take delivery of your new bikes - I promise - you are not going to be disappointed - Does the Scrambler take you to the land of joy?...well...I still haven't wiped the smile off my face... Bring on the warmer climes and the longer nights...Pass me my Davida lid and smoke me a kipper...I've got some serious riding to do... ;)

Boost.
 

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Having owned my red Icon for 9 days now, I reckon it's high time that I posted my opinion of this bike. (For comparison purposes, this is the 8th bike that I've owned, having mainly ridden Triumphs in the past. I love 'modern classic' bikes, have a real soft spot for the Bonneville range and my other bike is an R nineT).

The first thing that shocked me about the Scrambler is how light it feels, especially comparing it to the Bonneville which is around 40kg heavier. I'm still running the Scrambler in, but can already appreciate the significant acceleration advantage over the Bonnie - this thing is properly quick off the mark and has its power coming in at very usable road-riding speeds.

In terms of comfort, the rider triangle on this bike fits me like a glove, (I'm only 5'6" with a 29" inseam). The bars are noticeably wider than its main competitors, and as they're combined with a relatively low weight it's incredible how easy it is to drop the bike into turns. I took her along the Macclesfield to Buxton road last week, with a mate of mine on his Street Triple. I was taking it easy but he was struggling to keep up! The Scrambler feels absolutely at home on the twisties - I had a seriously big grin on my boat by the time I got to the bottom of the Cat & Fiddle road...

I've done a little bit of commuting on the bike and can report that it's fantastic in and out of traffic. Nipping past cars is effortless, especially in comparison with the Bonneville due to its advantageous power-to-weight ratio and the torque peaking so low down in the rev-range.

The only real criticisms I can think of regarding this bike are the somewhat disappointing exhaust note, (my nineT's stock exhaust sounds beautiful, so I don't know why other manufacturers can't push the EU restriction envelope further towards its limit - anyway - nothing a new exhaust can't fix). My only other criticism is the number of false neutrals that I'm finding. Having said that, I think my problem may be partly to do with me not being positive enough with some of my upshifts, (the gearbox is pretty agricultural and I'm also nursing an injured left ankle so that may be contributing towards the problem).

All in all then, I can't praise this bike highly enough. For what it costs this is an absolute bargain - I can honestly say that I've never enjoyed riding any other bikes as much as this one, (that's praise indeed, as I include my amazing R nineT in that statement). I can't wait to start tweaking a few parts...(my initial priorities are going to be heated grips and a throatier exhaust).

For all of you about to take delivery of your new bikes - I promise - you are not going to be disappointed - Does the Scrambler take you to the land of joy?...well...I still haven't wiped the smile off my face... Bring on the warmer climes and the longer nights...Pass me my Davida lid and smoke me a kipper...I've got some serious riding to do... ;)

Boost.
In 7 days time I join you in the real experience. Looking forward to it big time.;)
 

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Yes, thanks for the review. Congrats on the new bike!

Could you do me a favor and post some photos of the rear brake and shift levers, the passenger peg support showing it and the swingarm, and the top triple clamps? I was pretty disappointed with the fit and finish on the bike at the Chicago bike show and am seriously considering canceling my order because of it - but the salesman is telling me that these were mostly pre-production issues. The rear brake lever was very roughly made and the finish on the passenger peg support, swingarm, and triple clamps didn't match and looked quite thin and even worn. I'm very curious to see the production bike to compare.
 

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Enjoyed your review especially as you did the Cat & Fiddle - I'm in Derbyshire so know most of the roads well :)

Also good to hear the comparison with the Bonnie - I test road the Triumph Scrambler last summer so imagine them to be very similar.

How do you find the bike over bumps? For me this is the only area I'm worried about.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Having owned my red Icon for 9 days now, I reckon it's high time that I posted my opinion of this bike. (For comparison purposes, this is the 8th bike that I've owned, having mainly ridden Triumphs in the past. I love 'modern classic' bikes, have a real soft spot for the Bonneville range and my other bike is an R nineT).

The first thing that shocked me about the Scrambler is how light it feels, especially comparing it to the Bonneville which is around 40kg heavier. I'm still running the Scrambler in, but can already appreciate the significant acceleration advantage over the Bonnie - this thing is properly quick off the mark and has its power coming in at very usable road-riding speeds.

In terms of comfort, the rider triangle on this bike fits me like a glove, (I'm only 5'6" with a 29" inseam). The bars are noticeably wider than its main competitors, and as they're combined with a relatively low weight it's incredible how easy it is to drop the bike into turns. I took her along the Macclesfield to Buxton road last week, with a mate of mine on his Street Triple. I was taking it easy but he was struggling to keep up! The Scrambler feels absolutely at home on the twisties - I had a seriously big grin on my boat by the time I got to the bottom of the Cat & Fiddle road...

I've done a little bit of commuting on the bike and can report that it's fantastic in and out of traffic. Nipping past cars is effortless, especially in comparison with the Bonneville due to its advantageous power-to-weight ratio and the torque peaking so low down in the rev-range.

The only real criticisms I can think of regarding this bike are the somewhat disappointing exhaust note, (my nineT's stock exhaust sounds beautiful, so I don't know why other manufacturers can't push the EU restriction envelope further towards its limit - anyway - nothing a new exhaust can't fix). My only other criticism is the number of false neutrals that I'm finding. Having said that, I think my problem may be partly to do with me not being positive enough with some of my upshifts, (the gearbox is pretty agricultural and I'm also nursing an injured left ankle so that may be contributing towards the problem).

All in all then, I can't praise this bike highly enough. For what it costs this is an absolute bargain - I can honestly say that I've never enjoyed riding any other bikes as much as this one, (that's praise indeed, as I include my amazing R nineT in that statement). I can't wait to start tweaking a few parts...(my initial priorities are going to be heated grips and a throatier exhaust).

For all of you about to take delivery of your new bikes - I promise - you are not going to be disappointed - Does the Scrambler take you to the land of joy?...well...I still haven't wiped the smile off my face... Bring on the warmer climes and the longer nights...Pass me my Davida lid and smoke me a kipper...I've got some serious riding to do... ;)

Boost.
Thanks for your review Boost,

It is exactly what we all wanted to hear.I think from all the reviews we have read that all are disappointed with the exhaust note so most will change the system or get a slip on.

Also sure your aware that the Scrambler has an OEM heated grip option which is plug and play so no garish switches on your bar.

Looking forward to a 2 weekly update. ;)

Be safe.
 

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Its interesting to hear you mention the BMW R nine T it was one of the other bikes I was interested in and an absolute beauty of a bike, the big draw back for me was the price coming in around €17000 with alarm, heated grips and the seat hump. Good to hear you are very pleased with the Scrambler.
 

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Great review fellow scrambler rebel ;-)............that's exactly how I felt when I test rode the Red Icon a few days ago, wow a smile to my dile was written under the warm sweating helmet I was wearing. The test ride was supposed to be only granted for 15-20 mins but I pleaded with the dealer for 40-45mins and with no guide just made it sublime, I'm in Thailand mind you..... From the highways to narrow sandy trails I took it everwhere I could for the 45mins given. Wow this thing had it all, very forgiving on soft boggy terrain through to loads of torque on the highways. So I get back just in time - dealers comment "you want it right"? enough said......:) I get my Icon Red next month, let the good times roll and I can't wait.
 

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Having owned my red Icon for 9 days now, I reckon it's high time that I posted my opinion of this bike. (For comparison purposes, this is the 8th bike that I've owned, having mainly ridden Triumphs in the past. I love 'modern classic' bikes, have a real soft spot for the Bonneville range and my other bike is an R nineT).

The first thing that shocked me about the Scrambler is how light it feels, especially comparing it to the Bonneville which is around 40kg heavier. I'm still running the Scrambler in, but can already appreciate the significant acceleration advantage over the Bonnie - this thing is properly quick off the mark and has its power coming in at very usable road-riding speeds.

In terms of comfort, the rider triangle on this bike fits me like a glove, (I'm only 5'6" with a 29" inseam). The bars are noticeably wider than its main competitors, and as they're combined with a relatively low weight it's incredible how easy it is to drop the bike into turns. I took her along the Macclesfield to Buxton road last week, with a mate of mine on his Street Triple. I was taking it easy but he was struggling to keep up! The Scrambler feels absolutely at home on the twisties - I had a seriously big grin on my boat by the time I got to the bottom of the Cat & Fiddle road...

I've done a little bit of commuting on the bike and can report that it's fantastic in and out of traffic. Nipping past cars is effortless, especially in comparison with the Bonneville due to its advantageous power-to-weight ratio and the torque peaking so low down in the rev-range.

The only real criticisms I can think of regarding this bike are the somewhat disappointing exhaust note, (my nineT's stock exhaust sounds beautiful, so I don't know why other manufacturers can't push the EU restriction envelope further towards its limit - anyway - nothing a new exhaust can't fix). My only other criticism is the number of false neutrals that I'm finding. Having said that, I think my problem may be partly to do with me not being positive enough with some of my upshifts, (the gearbox is pretty agricultural and I'm also nursing an injured left ankle so that may be contributing towards the problem).

All in all then, I can't praise this bike highly enough. For what it costs this is an absolute bargain - I can honestly say that I've never enjoyed riding any other bikes as much as this one, (that's praise indeed, as I include my amazing R nineT in that statement). I can't wait to start tweaking a few parts...(my initial priorities are going to be heated grips and a throatier exhaust).

For all of you about to take delivery of your new bikes - I promise - you are not going to be disappointed - Does the Scrambler take you to the land of joy?...well...I still haven't wiped the smile off my face... Bring on the warmer climes and the longer nights...Pass me my Davida lid and smoke me a kipper...I've got some serious riding to do... ;)

Boost.

How are you finding the throttle? I was kind of hoping that the test version that the dealer had, might be early version of the bikes and hence the throttle response slightly different on the delivered ones (thought I'm probably wrong about that), is it a bit twitchy low down?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Albie - It's going to be a very long week for you! (well worth the wait, though!)

Chillra & JWA - I'll gladly post some pics but need a bit of an idiot's guide!

Shamone - The suspension is more than acceptable over bumpy terrain. I'd say that the quality of the damping is reflected in the reasonable price of the bike, but it's not bad at all. Put it this way - I'm not considering upgrading the suspension at this point. (It's also pretty stable travelling over uneven ground on corners, which is confidence inspiring).

Mixup - Good to hear that there's a plug-and-play option for heated grips - I'm going to order a set tomorrow, hoping to get them installed at the 1st service.

Celt - the R nineT is a cracking bike, and the superior components are reflected in the fairly hefty price. I think the Scrambler is far better value for money and basically more fun to ride.

Sola - Good to hear about your test-ride - sounds like you've tested the bike's terrain flexibility more than I have... Roll on next month, eh?!

Mitra - I read a lot of reviews raising an eyebrow at the harsh throttle response from a standing start, but I haven't found it to be a problem whatsoever. You can quickly calibrate your wrist sensitivity, bearing in mind that this bike has bags of low-down grunt. I really don't think you'll find the throttle to be too sensitive at all...

Boost.
 

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Chillra & JWA - I'll gladly post some pics but need a bit of an idiot's guide!
That would be great. Will you have the pics on your computer, or post them to a web-based gallery like Flickr or similar? Or, do you want to post them directly from your phone?
 

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If you reply to the thread (not quick reply) there is a paperclip icon (a small picture of a paper clip -- next to smiley face). Click on that and then select the file and upload the pictures from your computer. Bang. Zing.
 

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Cheers! Agreed on the lightness, I was proper surprised when first sitting on one at the show, you can really feel the difference between the Scrambler and the Bonnie when you go to bring it up off the kickstand IMO...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Pacman - Good question and kind of tough to explain, really. There's no doubting that my nineT is a top-notch bike with a serious amount of road presence and torque by the barrel load. Aesthetically speaking, I think it's a beautiful looking machine too. (As indeed, is the Scrambler).

The Scrambler is just so 'flickable' and manoeuvrable though - being lighter than the BMW and with a more relaxed seating position with wider bars, I find it easier to drop the Scrambler from one side to the other into turns. I can ride the Scrambler quicker through the twisties than I can the nineT. (that would reverse on faster, more open roads, however...)

I guess the bottom line is, the Scrambler is just so much fun to ride...(just wish the exhaust sounded as good as the BMW does stock).

Boost.
 
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