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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't had a new (as in showroom new) bike in 16 years. The last one was also a Ducati (2000 750 Monster). I picked up a new Urban Enduro less than a month ago now and so far I have changed:

1) footpegs
2) added front rock guards, dropped the skid plate
3) bought the license plate relocation kit (need to fit it)
4) got a bitchin' high pipe exhaust from Moto Corse (need to install)
5) got a new seat foam and cover from Seat Concepts
6) Installed the booster plug

I'm not complaining, but it seems like I am doing a lot of mods to this bike to make the bike I really wanted vs the one that comes straight from the dealer. In fact, I am not done yet. After a nice 50 mile ride last weekend it became clear that I need to upgrade the suspension - or at least the rear shock - to an Ohlins unit. Not to mention the tires that won't do diddly off road here in Muddy Memphis.

Did I make a mistake? I really like the powerband of this bike and love the feel of a Ducati, but it's taking a lot of effort to get this bike "done".
 

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The only real question is what other bike out there might have done it better for you?

The Mustang seat has been my best upgrade and made the bike suddenly feel great for me. I agree with you about no traction offroad with 36psi in those tires.

Everyone buys the bike for different reasons though. I upgraded from a Yamaha TW200. I wanted something that had similar ergonomics but had 5 times the horsepower. That's exactly what I feel I got (on the street.) But I definitely can't take it off road to the places I used to take my TW200. But I can ride it on the interstate and go much further in a day.

I'm still seeking out a small (250cc) enduro of some sort to add to my collection because the Scrambler does nothing for me off road even though I know other people ride it offroad. Offroading it just destroys the bike and gives me a substandard offroad experience.

As a city/commuter/leisure bike it's awesome. Everything I want. I still would like to get a new rear shock or at the very least a softer spring for the rear shock that's on there. I'm happy with the power output, braking, electrical (night time lighting.) It's a good standard street bike for me. A horrible offroad bike for me though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The only real question is what other bike out there might have done it better for you?

I'm happy with the power output, braking, electrical (night time lighting.) It's a good standard street bike for me. A horrible offroad bike for me though.
I think you hit the nail on the head - I'm happy with these qualities of the bike as well. So happy, in fact, that I really enjoy the bike still. However, I had a Monster for years and it seems like as an all around street bike the Monster was a better bike out of the box. As for off-road - I like to ride gravel/dirt roads a bit so I want to TEACH this bike to be a real Scrambler - i.e. rock guards, high pipe, shock, etc.

I'm still happy with the purchase, but I really feel like Ducati could have done more to make it the right bike from the start. Sounds like I am not the only one, though.
 

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So, way back when before dedicated models we bought bikes and changed them to be: motocross dirt bikes, flat trackers, road racers, enduros and desert racers. (The Scrambler term comes from the Hare Scramble races). Everyone spent time, money and effort changing their bikes.

Ducati played into the retro effort by making the (cheaper) Scrambler for base costs and figuring they and everyone else would sell parts.

So what's not to love? With a bit of fiddling.
 

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The Scrambler is truly the jack of all trades, and the master of none. Think about it, there is not one category where this bike excels. But, it can do a little of everything. You can ride it to the race track, have some fun on the track, and then take the slightly beaten path home. Not too many bikes can do all that in factory form.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The Scrambler is truly the jack of all trades, and the master of none. Think about it, there is not one category where this bike excels. But, it can do a little of everything. You can ride it to the race track, have some fun on the track, and then take the slightly beaten path home. Not too many bikes can do all that in factory form.
In the good old days in the USA we used to call these motorcycles Triumphs. I just build a 1964 desert sled last year. It was common for racers to ride to the event, take off their lights (in face, there was a quick detach headlight on some Triumph models in the 60s) and then ride back home after a good flat track race.

I get it. I love the idea. I can still complain about the suspension and hard ass seat, though!
 

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In the good old days in the USA we used to call these motorcycles Triumphs. I just build a 1964 desert sled last year. It was common for racers to ride to the event, take off their lights (in face, there was a quick detach headlight on some Triumph models in the 60s) and then ride back home after a good flat track race.

I get it. I love the idea. I can still complain about the suspension and hard ass seat, though!
I know you said you already bought the Seat Concepts kit. Hopefully that works out for you. The Mustang seat completely transformed my bike for me from almost unrideable to completely rideable. It's the most comfortable of my three bikes now.

For me I just don't want to beat up this bike enough to try to make it an offroad bike. I'm just going to buy a ~1500-2500 dollar used Japanese Enduro like a Yamaha XT225 or XT250. THAT is way cheaper than modding the Scrambler. But I have space to store multiple bikes. Then in the endi have a bike for 75% of the time (scrambler) and the other 25% of the time I'd ride the Enduro.

I already own two other street bikes, so I might be a bit of the crazy cat lady though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know you said you already bought the Seat Concepts kit. Hopefully that works out for you. The Mustang seat completely transformed my bike for me from almost unrideable to completely rideable. It's the most comfortable of my three bikes now.

For me I just don't want to beat up this bike enough to try to make it an offroad bike. I'm just going to buy a ~1500-2500 dollar used Japanese Enduro like a Yamaha XT225 or XT250. THAT is way cheaper than modding the Scrambler. But I have space to store multiple bikes. Then in the endi have a bike for 75% of the time (scrambler) and the other 25% of the time I'd ride the Enduro.

I already own two other street bikes, so I might be a bit of the crazy cat lady though.
Well, if I wanted cheaper I wouldn't have bought a Ducati to begin with! I have enough dirt bikes and even two vintage enduro bikes ('73 Triumph TR5T and a '64 Triumph desert sled). Both are quite capable off road. I just wanted a NEW bike that I could ride mostly on the street and not be AFRAID to take off road - the pipe, the lack of shielding, the seat and suspension made me AFRAID. Crap, I have better shocks on the '64! Anyway, I just had to rant a bit - I don't mind spending the money on a Ducati, but if it was a Jap bike or something, I would never fork over all of this cash for modifications.
 

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I am 100% satisfied with this purchase.

Sure, one can upgrade/change things...for example, I swapped my Icon seat for a like new Urban seat that I purchased from a fellow member on this site at a good price.

It's an excellent, all around, basic motorcycle, that is a blast to ride for a reasonable price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Looks quite similar to what I did to my UE. And yes, it takes effort and money ;)
To date it has taken an additional $2,235.29 to get the bike where I want it - just for a little perspective. BTW - I saw the QD exhaust on your bike and it was exactly what I was looking for - good price too, compared to the Ducati high exhaust which doesn't look as good and costs 2X more!
 

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I think any of us could do pretty good for ourselves on the used bike market plinking down 10k USD on some sort of adventure machine built for both the road and offroad. But I still can't really think about any new bikes that really do anything for me more than the Scrambler does.

There's a lot of boring Japanese offerings that just wouldn't scratch the itch and everything else costs more.

As cool as this bike is, it's also impractical for street use even though it's street legal where I live. (Amazing, a street legal 2 stroke) But I can't in my right mind come off of 7200 dollars USD to purchase a Beta Xtrainer for offroad use.

 

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Nice bike silverluxe; finding one that clean and well-kept must have been like a needle in a haystack, congrats to you!

Sarah
 
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