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I have a 2022 Nightshift. I mostly love the bike, but it didn't take me long to realize I needed to upgrade the suspension to get the ride I expect. Particularly my previous 2000s Monster was never this snatchy up front.

There is a wealth of well regarded rear shocks, and that's an easy switch, so I'll just choose based on availability.

But the fork upgrade options are a tougher call, since fitting them is a lot more involved. Right now I am looking at:
I'm a casual rider, mostly just shorter trips around the city and surrounds (currently Los Angeles), some longer roadtrips to nearby towns, and some weekend rides around the twisty mountain roads. I'm not a racer (hence the 800 Scrambler!), but I do want a well setup bike. I don't expect to be making regular adjustments once I have the bike dialed in.

I don't feel great about spending too much on a bike at this price point ('m not going to completely replace the forks for 3K!), but I am willing to do what it takes to get the right ride.

I'd love any feedback or thoughts, especially from anyone with direct experience of any of the options above, or others I might have missed.

Thanks all!
 

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I went full Ohlins, NIX-30., they're absolutely great, and when you add in the;price and hassles to get the cartridges installed, total cost isn't al that much more than other cartridge options. You can't go wrong with Ohlons, but...

....whatever route you go, whichever manufacturer you chose, the most important bit may be getting the spring rate right. I got the springs they recommended when I bought mine through Revzilla, and while these would be great for track use, they're a bit stiffer than I'd like for.. well.., scrambling... around beat up mountain roads here in the SF Bay area I imagine are a lot like some of the ones you have in mind down around LA. Someday I'd like to switch to springs that are 10% or so softer.

Oh yes, about that installation. If you have a milling machine and know what you're doing, or a drill press and really know what you're doing -- I know some people have done this using only a hand drill, but some people have also played quarterback for the Los Angeles Rams -- the Infamous Lag Screw can still be a bit tricky to drill out. If you're absolutely positive you've got this sported, by all means do it yourself. Otherwise, talk it over with the shop and make sure they're know what they're getting in to. If this is a good suspension shop, they can also help you pick the right springs for the kind of riding you're going to do.
 

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I have a 2022 Nightshift. I mostly love the bike, but it didn't take me long to realize I needed to upgrade the suspension to get the ride I expect. Particularly my previous 2000s Monster was never this snatchy up front.

There is a wealth of well regarded rear shocks, and that's an easy switch, so I'll just choose based on availability.

But the fork upgrade options are a tougher call, since fitting them is a lot more involved. Right now I am looking at:
I'm a casual rider, mostly just shorter trips around the city and surrounds (currently Los Angeles), some longer roadtrips to nearby towns, and some weekend rides around the twisty mountain roads. I'm not a racer (hence the 800 Scrambler!), but I do want a well setup bike. I don't expect to be making regular adjustments once I have the bike dialed in.

I don't feel great about spending too much on a bike at this price point ('m not going to completely replace the forks for 3K!), but I am willing to do what it takes to get the right ride.

I'd love any feedback or thoughts, especially from anyone with direct experience of any of the options above, or others I might have missed.

Thanks all!
I went with the Maxton - probably not as smooth as the more expensive options but makes a significant improvement. Rear is an M-Tech, which IMO is very good.
Whichever one you go with, it will be a noticeable improvement!!
 

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I went with the Andreani. Best compromise between cheapest and most expensive- met all the requirements I needed. The ohlins or the nitron were overkill both on a cost basis and has more capability than I will ever use. It works out great, and if you have a good suspension shop near you would recommend having it done. You did not specify but you also need to upgrade the shock as well. Completely transformed my bike.
 

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I went with the Andreani. Best compromise between cheapest and most expensive- met all the requirements I needed. The ohlins or the nitron were overkill both on a cost basis and has more capability than I will ever use. It works out great, and if you have a good suspension shop near you would recommend having it done. You did not specify but you also need to upgrade the shock as well. Completely transformed my bike.
I also went with the Andreani kit up front. I needed to relocate the speedo with the Rizoma kit to have easier access to the adjustment screws and nuts. After sagging the front and rear (Ohlins), the bike rides better, tips in easier (dropped the triple crown by 4mm) and is quite a bit more comfortable on rougher terrain.
 

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I have a 2022 Nightshift. I mostly love the bike, but it didn't take me long to realize I needed to upgrade the suspension to get the ride I expect. Particularly my previous 2000s Monster was never this snatchy up front.

There is a wealth of well regarded rear shocks, and that's an easy switch, so I'll just choose based on availability.

But the fork upgrade options are a tougher call, since fitting them is a lot more involved. Right now I am looking at:
I'm a casual rider, mostly just shorter trips around the city and surrounds (currently Los Angeles), some longer roadtrips to nearby towns, and some weekend rides around the twisty mountain roads. I'm not a racer (hence the 800 Scrambler!), but I do want a well setup bike. I don't expect to be making regular adjustments once I have the bike dialed in.

I don't feel great about spending too much on a bike at this price point ('m not going to completely replace the forks for 3K!), but I am willing to do what it takes to get the right ride.

I'd love any feedback or thoughts, especially from anyone with direct experience of any of the options above, or others I might have missed.

Thanks all!
 

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Enjoying Ohlins in back and the Andreanis up front on my ‘15 Classic. Reasonable to sag, change the tire pressure slightly on hot vs. cool days, plus dropped the front a few mm in the triple clamp. Bike tips in easily plus gives me a reasonable ride for a scrambler. It’s no barca-lounger, but that’s why I have a touring bike too.
 
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